About Brazilian citizenship

Discussion in 'Brazil NSR' started by stat redded, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. stat redded

    stat redded Red Card

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    According to http://www.multiplecitizenship.com/wscl/ws_BRAZIL.html,
    Brazil doesn't recognize dual citizenship.

    mmm...to the best of my memory, Ronaldo acquired Spanish citizenship, didn't he? Did he give up Brazilian citizenship? No way... He played 2006WC
    for Brazil NT..

    What do you think of it?:confused:

    Thanks.


  2. Mengão86

    Mengão86 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Location:
    Maryland
    Club:
    Flamengo Rio Janeiro
    Country:
    Brazil
    I have dual citizenship..
  3. ChiBrasil

    ChiBrasil New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2001
    Location:
    Cuiaba, Brasil
    So do my kids, born to American parents who live in Cuiaba, MT.
  4. NitrousOxide

    NitrousOxide New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2004
    Location:
    Serravale San Marino
    I also have dual citizenship from my dad(Brazilian) and mom(Itailan). Even if you are not born in the country or don't have any parents from other countries, any good expensive lawyer can find a ninche in the Law to get you dual citizenship, which i believe is most of the cases of Football players.


  5. Century's Best

    Century's Best Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    USA
    From my research (and I strongly advise you contact your local Brazilian consulate if in doubt), Brazilian law indeed does not recognize dual citizenship. Unlike other nations which obligated you to surrender your native citizenship upon naturalization in another country (or which actually strips you of it), Brazil does not acknowledge one of its citizen’s acquisition of a second citizenship.

    Therefore, don’t expect to be treated like an American in Brazil just because you own a US passport. Once on Brazilian soil you are just another Brazilian citizen subject to all Brazilian laws and obligations. The only way one can be free of the demands imposed by Brazilian law on its citizens is if you formally renounce your Brazilian citizenship (and if I recall, there is a way for one to cancel that renouncing and to re-acquire Brazilian citizenship).

    From my experience as a dual citizen, US law does not recognize (formally) dual citizenship either. It is aware dual nationality exists, but you must of course leave the US and re-enter the US with a US passport.
  6. Mengão86

    Mengão86 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Location:
    Maryland
    Club:
    Flamengo Rio Janeiro
    Country:
    Brazil
    Century's Best is right. I have to go to the Brasilian embassy every year until I am 32 (I believe) to renew my military forms since I am considered a Brasilian citizen. If I don't do that, I lose my Brasilian citizenship.
  7. Century's Best

    Century's Best Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    USA
    In my experience, maintaining the army enlistment document in order has been a major headache. I fortunately had it in order when I had to go to the consulate in 2003 to get a new passport due to an expected vacation in Brazil.

    Unlike the US, Brazil issues passports valid for 5 years. But I wasn't aware about the 32 years of age rule re: military documents. I might have to call the consulate to double-check.
  8. Mengão86

    Mengão86 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Location:
    Maryland
    Club:
    Flamengo Rio Janeiro
    Country:
    Brazil
    Yeah, it really is a headache. I was told this because I had a vacation to Brasil last year. If I didn't go, I still would have not known.

    Source: http://www.brasilemb.org/consulado/consulado_militar.shtml (Brasilian embassy website at Washington DC)
  9. Century's Best

    Century's Best Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    USA
  10. Mengão86

    Mengão86 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Location:
    Maryland
    Club:
    Flamengo Rio Janeiro
    Country:
    Brazil
    Yeah, lucky you. I still have 11 more years to go..:rolleyes:
  11. thetaylor310

    thetaylor310 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2004
    Location:
    São Paulo-SP, BRASIL
    Club:
    Palmeiras Sao Paulo
    Country:
    Brazil
    Bom dia~

    Well, i found my experience to be somewhat different. Atualmente, i am going to Brasil next Monday and two weeks ago, i was preparing to go into Brasil through an educational visa through my American passport (as you can see, i will be in Campo Mourão-PR for the next four months to study)

    You see, here's my thing. i, of course, was born in Brasil (sou paulista) but whilst i was there in Brasil, my mom acquired for me Korean citizenship. i moved here to the US in 87 and i JUST recently acquired American citizenship last February. i was under the impression that my Brasilian citizenship was automatically renounced since i was given Korean citizenship...

    So... i go to the Consulado in Beverly Hills and i present my docs... all of a sudden, the ladies at the window see that i was born in São Paulo and they are like, "Sir, you are a Brasilian citizen; you cannot stand in this line"! Even though i explained that i became an American citizen, they said that i still am a Brasilian citizen as well. They point me to the Brasileiros Only line and i get a passport renewal form (since i did hold an old Brasilian passport) and the "Alistamento de militar" form. The gentleman who i spoke with said that the passport renewal process takes a month~ :eek: :confused:

    The next day, i go back to the Consulado and i present my application and the lady who received my docs explained to me that all i had to do is to come every January to sign the "Adiamento de incorporação" every year. i even asked her, "If i decided to stay in Brasil, would i have to enlist?" and she said no

    Since i already bought my ticket and i explained to her my situation, she was able to call Brasil and she approved my application for faster processing. i will receive my renewed Brasilian passport this Friday and i will be in Brasil come next week~ :D

    Minus the expensive valet parking deal at their building (which happens to be located in the Larry Flynt Publications bldg hehe), i found this experience to be pretty pleasant and i have no qualms with going to the Consulado every year to register with the army

    i wasn't aware at all that Brasil has compulsory military service for male citizens until this whole fiasco. But at least it seems simpler to deal with than the Korean version; they usually don't give waivers and i have heard horror stories of actual Korean-American 20somethings being dragged to boot camp at the airport

    And yes, i have an American passport as well
  12. thetaylor310

    thetaylor310 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2004
    Location:
    São Paulo-SP, BRASIL
    Club:
    Palmeiras Sao Paulo
    Country:
    Brazil
    haha... i know! i now have seven years left myself~ :p
  13. Mengão86

    Mengão86 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Location:
    Maryland
    Club:
    Flamengo Rio Janeiro
    Country:
    Brazil
    Unfortunatly for me, the DC embassy is a pain to get to by car and there is almost no parking whatsoever. I have to take the metro every year and wait in a long line to renew my forms (there is no just Brasilian line). It's a pain!
  14. thetaylor310

    thetaylor310 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2004
    Location:
    São Paulo-SP, BRASIL
    Club:
    Palmeiras Sao Paulo
    Country:
    Brazil
    Yeah... my contact in Brasil told me that the Embassy is one of the most difficult to deal with. i'm pretty glad that i'm over here in Cali :)
  15. ChiBrasil

    ChiBrasil New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2001
    Location:
    Cuiaba, Brasil
    I did a little checking when I got home from work. After looking through my papers I found a document issued by the US Embassy in Brasilia called (I think) a Consuler Report of Birth Abroad. In it, my kids are refered to as US citizens. However, being born in Brasil, they are also native (not the right word) Brasilian citizens.

    We know several people who can claim dual-citizenship. My kids will have to follow Brasilian law to keep their Brasilian passaports active.

    It is fun to enter the US on their American Passports, and then turn around and enter Brasil on their Brasilian Passports.

    I also would argue that the Brasilian Consulate in Chicago is the worst in the world. The rudest people I have ever dealt with.
  16. leonidas

    leonidas Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2005
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Club:
    Palmeiras Sao Paulo
    Country:
    Brazil
    yeah i havent done this shit since i turned 18. i have the stamp on my passport saying that i have an enlistment ID and all that stuff. i guess i should go and get it stamped one of these days.
  17. Century's Best

    Century's Best Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    USA
    A few years ago I sent a scathing email to the NY consulate accusing them of rudeness. Someone close to me who forgot his Portuguese called and was not well treated. I flat out told them that they were rude because they considered illegal alien Brazilians in the US "low class" and hence they felt free to be condescending.

    The next day I got a formally written email refuting my accusation and saying that the consulate's staff makes no discrimination between Brazilians with legal or illegal status in the US.

    Personally however, my most recent experience was, as I said, my 2003 visit for a new passport. I was treated normally, and they even gave me a break - I went there for a new passport 1 week before my vacation. Normally it would've taken 3 weeks, but I got it on time - on the day of my flight.

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