College Coach Salaries

Discussion in 'College & Amateur Soccer' started by ACSOCCER, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. ACSOCCER

    ACSOCCER New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Location:
    NJ
    Could we start a list of estimated full-time College Coach Salaries? I have been coaching/teaching High School for several years, played in college, have a MA in Admin. & a National "D" license & US Youth License. I am looking for a career change(fulltime college soccer) but don't know if it is worth it to relocate/etc for my family especially if I will make less money than I do now. Please help me out soccer people! Also do most have benefits?


  2. ClarkC

    ClarkC Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    I would schedule the next USSF license course (C) and the next NSCAA diploma (maybe Advanced Regional) if you are getting ready to apply for a college coaching position.
  3. pumpkinhead

    pumpkinhead New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    No. We can't.
  4. Damon

    Damon Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2001
    Location:
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    United States
    Agreed, and while you're checking into the NSCAA courses, I'd also make time to take the first two (State & Regional) GKer courses as well. Even if you were a GKer in college, it's nice to have those courses under your belt. I believe they're both weekend courses.

    Also, unless you end up at a larger DI school, I'll be that your salary will take a dip if you leave the HS ranks. Of course, you can always supplement your income with summer camps, as most if not all college coaches do. Becoming involved with a local club is also another way to increase your earnings. But I don't think that should be your motivation to coach at the college level (and I bet it is not). If you have kiddos you should also, IMHO, consider the time away from your family during road trips. A wise man once suggested that I to "avoid coaching other kids only to lose track of your own" type situations at all costs. I think that is very well said; that situation is nearly impossible to avoid, I would think, at the college level.


  5. to look but we

    to look but we New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Not including camp. My guess.
    D1 Lolla 130,000 U of L
    D2 McCrath 115,000 Seattle P.
    D3 ??
    NAIA Wells 90,000 Lindsey
    Juco Zagara 90,000 Ga. P. includes teaching
  6. LoboLife

    LoboLife New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2006
    Location:
    Maryland
    I would bet that you're very, very wrong
  7. Epikoinos

    Epikoinos Soccer player-coach-manager-journalist

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon, WI
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    United States
  8. oldguyfc

    oldguyfc New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago
    Considering that the HC job at UCF has a whopping $32,000 salary, and that the Valpo job was $31,000; not to mention that most coaches in Div 1 make a considerable amount less than $100,000 a year; I'd say that bet's a sure thing.
  9. Dsocc

    Dsocc Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2002
    Yep. The mean for D1 base salaries is in the $35,000 - $45,000 range, which is usually the low-to mid range of university "Instructor" equivalent pay scale (gotta remember that the pay scale is set, first and foremost, by the academic side). Health benefits are typically very good. Camp money can be a significant addition to the base salary.

    Beyond the coaches who have individual contracts with the likes of Nike or adidas (like Lolla for example), you can count on one hand the number of D1 coaches with actual salaries in excess of $65,000.
  10. oldguyfc

    oldguyfc New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago
    Just as you can count on one hand the number of coaches who have camp programs that are the likes of the one that Jerry Yeagley started at IU.
  11. SammyP

    SammyP Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    In today's athletics world more and more coaches (yes even soccer) are getting multi-year deals with buyouts (perhaps a reprecussion of Lolla's getting bought out) - however, that's only a small percentage of the coaches. Camps are where the real money is at. Programs like IU, Clemson, UVA, UNC, SMU and a host of others pack as many kids into camps as possible because the universities let their coaches run the camps and the potential is out there for hundreds of thousands of dollars for a year

    This money can be considered part of a salary, as it is what makes some coaches much more well off -but if you don't count camps in salaries are low...especially compared to to women's soccer coaching salaries (thank you Title IX)
  12. oldguyfc

    oldguyfc New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago
    And the running of the camp is no easy pickings either. There are many people that get paid from the monies, including the university for use of facilities. Insurance, equipment, etc. Most of the big camps have sponsership deals with them, but it is a large undertaking to run a successful camp, and it just doesn't happen out of fiat. Not to mention,its a highly competitive field.
  13. Ted Eck

    Ted Eck New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    So to answer the guys question....him going in and getting a decent full time assistant job...good luck...........him goin in and getting a head job, good luck...his wife allowing him to take a second assistant job with a family...good luck.


    Its just way too competitive. All these head jobs that open, you have former pro players, capable assistants and other head guys in on them....its very tough for an outsider to get in the mix.

    Lastly, making money off camps is not as easy as poeple think........even trying to make 35K off of a camp business can be tough....and coaching lisecences (and masters) dont carry the clout they did 12-15 years ago...its who you know and your body of work.
  14. 5hole

    5hole Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    The UCF job is NOT PAYING 32k.

    I would say the range is pretty wide. Judging from your experience you will most likely be starting near the bottom.

    A lot of NAIA asst jobs are part time with 10k type salaries.
    Guessing the D1 range head salary somewhere around 25k to low 100k.

    Think you are very wrong about UL, Seattle Pac and the NAIA job. It's soccer. Not sure d2 head football coaches make 6 figures. A good quality head men's job is going to pay around 50-65k base.
  15. Mike Fekula

    Mike Fekula Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2000
    At Maryland, the campus student newspaper, the Diamondback, publishes the annual salaries of all university employees. Since Maryland is a state institution, the Diamondback has been able to successfuly file Freedom of Information Act requests in order to get the database. They reveal the list in the spring, usually at the end of April.

    Men's Soccer Sasho Cirovski: $134,094.00 he has been there 16 years.
    Asst. Coach Russell Payne: $40,600 has been there 2 years.

    Women's Soccer: Brian Pensky, $81,200 has been there two years.
    Asst. Coach: Leo Cullen $43,000 just left to go into private industry.

    I would assume the numbers for all are slightly higher now IF the coaches are getting the COLA that other university employees get.
  16. Sandon Mibut

    Sandon Mibut Member+

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Good stuff, Mike.

    All of the salaries for any coach at a public school are available as they are part of the public record. Are they available on-line? I dunno, maybe. But it shouldn't be too hard to get the info for any state school in whatever state you live in. Odds are it's published somewhere and if it's not, it's just a matter of requesting the info. As a taxpayer, you can simply write your local state senator or assemblyman and request the info and odds are they'll give it to you.

    BTW, to clarify on Leo Cullen, he didn't just go into private industry but he went and became an agent and by sheer coincidence his first two clients just happened to be players he had a little extra access to, Chis Seitz and Maurice Edu. That's not an NCAA violation but it really gets close to being against the spirit of the rules. (That said, most NCAA rules are total BS and deserve to be stretched, flaunted and ignored.)
  17. esther15

    esther15 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Lolla is being paid 6 figures at Louisville
  18. Kubby

    Kubby Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Public schools in South Carolina:

    NCAA DIVISION 1

    MEN
    Charleston - Ralph Lundy, $74,880
    Clemson - Trevor Adair, $90,838
    Coastal Carolina - Shaun Docking, $56,650
    South Carolina - Mark Berson, $83,121
    Winthrop - Rich Posipanko, $55,500

    WOMEN
    Charleston - Kevin Dempsey, less than $50,000
    The Citadel - Bob Winch, less than $50,000
    Clemson - Todd Bramble, $77,250
    Coastal Carolina - Rohan Naraine, less than $50,000
    Francis Marion - Marty Beall, less than $50,000
    South Carolina - Shelley Smith, $78,274
    South Carolina State - Amy Olson, less than $50,000
    Winthrop - Melissa Heinz, less than $50,000

    NCAA DIVISION 2

    MEN
    Francis Marion - Kevin Varnado, less than $50,000 (former men's soccer coach Murray Hartzler is the Athletics Director now at FMU and makes $92,282)
    Lander - Van Taylor, $53,485

    WOMEN
    Lander - Chris Ayer, less than $50,000
  19. ButlerBob

    ButlerBob Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2001
    Location:
    Evanston, IL
    Club:
    DC United
    Country:
    United States
  20. Ted Eck

    Ted Eck New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    5 hole.....I am dying to know which assistants (even the ones at IU with the best camp) who make 100,000. This is not basketball....Id be very surprised if 1 assistant/associate coach makes six figures
  21. Sandon Mibut

    Sandon Mibut Member+

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Great stuff, Kubby.

    Just to be clear, this is base salary and doesn't include any camp money (likely a good chunk at Clemson and SC) or any shoe money they may be getting.

    Shoe deals for college coaches have gone down a lot since the inception of MLS. Shoe companies feel players move more product than any college program and put their money that direction. Some coaches still get some money, but it's not like what Arena, Schmid, Yeagley, Hyndman, etc... were getting 10-15 years ago.

    A lot of college coaches, both head and assistant, also supplement their income coaching local youth clubs and doing stuff at the state or regional ODP level.
  22. to look but we

    to look but we New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    I realize this is a little idealalistic but coaches should not be spending time on summer camps or coaching youth clubs. They should be paid well enough to focus all their efforts towards the University soccer program.
  23. SammyP

    SammyP Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Do not both of these outside areas count as potential recruiting opportunities - that combined with the money available means a coach would be stupid not to persue things.
  24. oldguyfc

    oldguyfc New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago
    There are,literally, hundreds of kids who've been able to receive help with college by attending JUST the Indiana U. summer camp that has been going on for decades. Not only have kids gone to IU that attended the camp, but there are countless other universities whoes coaches have worked that camp and recognized players. Not only that, but a kid who might have gone to the summer camp would be recommended by those working the camp if asked by another coach about that particular kid. These camps continue to be a source of extra income for many people, not just the coaches, and a valued recruitment vechicle for all the people, including the players, involved.
  25. Sandon Mibut

    Sandon Mibut Member+

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    I think the inverse of your statement is that the outside employment opportunities allow good coaches to stay in the game and still make a decent living.

    If coaches were forced to live just on what the colleges pay them, the college coaching community would lose a lot of quality staff to either youth clubs or to non-soccer gigs.

    The above proposal isn't just "a little idealisitc" but totally unrealistic and impossible. College soccer doesn't generate revenue. That grown men can still make a living on college campuses coaching soccer is practically a mircale. Expecting the colleges to pay them even more so they don't need to supplement their incomes shows an absolute failure at grasping the economic landscape of college soccer.

Share This Page