Debate or Diplomacy in History of Soccer

Discussion in 'Soccer History' started by soccerfamily, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. soccerfamily

    soccerfamily New Member

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    My 15 year old has to do a history fair project and he works better when it has to do with soccer. Any ideas for Debate or diplomacy in the history of soccer?

    Thanks!


  2. PDG1978

    PDG1978 Member+

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    I'm not sure but maybe the betting scandel, and specifically allegations about involvement by Paolo Rossi, in Italy in 1980 I believe. Rossi was given a 3 year ban, which was reduced to 2 to allow him to play for Italy in the 1982 World Cup, which Italy won with Rossi finishing as top-scorer of the tournament.
  3. Excape Goat

    Excape Goat Member+

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    The global spread of the game was created by the British Empire. However, most places where the game took hold (Central America, South America and Europe) were not in the British Empire. In fact, most of the countries (Australia, India, new Zealand, Canada) formerly inside the British Empire are not very interested in soccer.
  4. moqq

    moqq New Member

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    maybe the "maracanazo"?


  5. DanFla

    DanFla Member

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    Maybe about the history that Pelé stopped a war in Nigeria.
  6. Roger Allaway

    Roger Allaway Member+

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    The game was mostly spread by British commercial efforts, such as shipping and railroad building, in Argentina, Brazil, etc., rather than by diplomatic efforts. The British citizens who spread soccer around the world tended to be people who were in the places they were because the companies they worked for sent them there, not because their government sent them there.

    Tell your son to look for a book titled "The World's Game," by Bill Murray, an Australian history professor.
  7. soccerfamily

    soccerfamily New Member

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    Thanks for the ideas. He also thought of "the Soccer War" - 1969. We also just got a book called "The Ball is Round," which seems to be a soccer history book.

    If anyone thinks of any other ideas, we'd be happy to hear them!
  8. Excape Goat

    Excape Goat Member+

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    The death match is another interesting topic.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Death_Match


    Hollywood actually made a movie out of it starting Pele and Sylvester Stallone. The movie was made in 1981 during the height of the Cold War. They did not want to make a movie that gloried the enemy. So they changed the movie to Western Europe and the goalkeeper became American to suit the American audience. Of course, Hollywood loves happy ending so they changed it.
  9. Roger Allaway

    Roger Allaway Member+

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    The Death Match is a very good one. There is a book about it, "Dynamo" by Andrew Dougan.

    Be careful of overstating the connection to soccer of the Honduras-El Salvador war. Soccer may have been the match that lit the fire, but the war wasn't really about soccer.

    Another good one might be the 1934 World Cup, which Mussolini turned into a fascist rally similar to what Hitler did two years later with the Olympics.

    The Soviet Union forfeited a playoff with Chile in qualifying for the 1974 World Cup in protest against the fact that the national stadium in Santiago, where one of the legs of the playoff would have been held, had been used to hold prisoners after the coup d'etat that overthrew Allende.

    Gaddafi got Libya in trouble with FIFA about 20 years ago over a plan to throw World Cup qualifiers against other Arab countries.

    Both Israel and Taiwan have had trouble over the years with politically-opposed countries refusing to play them in World Cup qualifiers.

    There was a lot of hullabaloo at the 1938 World Cup over teams giving the fascist salute in pre-game ceremonies.

    In New York, there is a small stadium called Gaelic Park, where games of gaelic football are played. It used to be called Croke Park, after the main gaelic football stadium in Dublin, but gaelic football authorities in Ireland made them change the name of the stadium in New York after hearing that occasional games of soccer, the English sport, were being played there.
  10. Excape Goat

    Excape Goat Member+

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    Iran under the Shah was the only Muslim country willing to play them.

    Taiwan is a different issue. They were playing as "Republic of China" until 1970's. The players, however, came from Hong Kong. Meanwhile, Red China was not allowed to play throughout the same period. I believed Red China gained international status in 1973 or 1974 and then, Taiwan joined Oceania in 1975. i don't know the story behind it. Actually, both Chinas did not enter the WC until 1978(Taiwan entered 1978, but Red China did not enter until 1982). I do not know the reason behind why China(Taiwan) did not play in the WC until 1978.

    This is actually confusing. I actually saw a small report by CNN on the Olympics. Even, they got confused. They thought Taiwan was not allowed to enter the Olympics until 1984. In fact, they were there under Republic of China banner. Red China was not there until 1984. Taiwan would have missed 1980(I believed) and Red China would be there as "China". But Moscow 1980 was boycotted so they waited until 1984 when both countries entered the Olympics.
  11. Cool Rob

    Cool Rob Member

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    ^^^ Good ideas; parallel the growth and reach of the British Empire with the global dissemination of the game

    Also: (Diplomacy in the US) Henry Kissinger was instrumental in beinging Pele to the US for play for the Cosmos

    Mussolini's great interest in the game in the 1930's (parallels Hitler's 1936 Berlin Olympics) to further fascism

    The racial integration of Brazilian teams inthe 1920's and 1930's in Vasco da Gama and Flamengo forshadowed and informed the country's identity and multi-racial ethic.

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