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Food Peeves

Discussion in 'Food & Travel' started by bungadiri, Mar 6, 2012.

Moderators: lawrenceterp
  1. maturin

    maturin Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
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    Minneapolis, MN
    Andrew Wray is a primary antagonist of Stephen Maturin in the book series my username is pulled from (which everyone, and I mean everyone, should read).
     


  2. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    mermoz-les-boss
    Club:
    Olympique Lyonnais
    Country:
    France
    [​IMG]
    ?
     
  3. Frieslander

    Frieslander Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2000
    Location:
    North Jersey
    It is. Cilantro is the spanish word for coriander. We Americans use it to refer to the leaf and say, "coriander" to refer to the seed. Kind of like saying cookie (from the Dutch, "Koekje") instead of biscuit.
     
  4. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    ah yes, what does and does not constitute a biscuit?

    what is called such in america can obviously be nothing of the kind as they are not baked twice as are biscotti... and in fact bear no resemblance at all to any of the diverse items called biscuits in other climes. most of what passes for biscuits in blighty are so named by similar error.

    in france most cookies are properly called gateaux secs, but the term biscuit is often misused in common parlance, the confusion being due to several common varieties of cookie being indeed twice baked.

    completely different are biscottes, known in germany as zwieback and in america as either zwieback (following the correct german spelling) or zweiback (by the curious mechanism of retransliterating the english pronunciation back into german spelling patterns): slightly sweetened dry toasts eaten at breakfast with butter or jam and by some criminally deranged individuals dunked at this time into café au lait.

    the dutch, beyond the aforementioned koekje (which from his username i imagine my respected colleague might pronounce as english cookie) have biskwie and beschuit which correspond in pronunciation to the french words (roughly) and in taste and texture to the french items (even more imperfectly: in the case of beschuit these cannot even be saved by muisjes, gestampt or otherwise; as for hagelslag, a french palate finds this closer to wax than chocolate).
     


  5. Frieslander

    Frieslander Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    I would pronounce it as kook-yuh but then again, the only thing completely Dutch/Frisian about me is my blood and I'm so out of it I thought I was adding to a current discussion, not re-hashing one that was 4 days old.
     
  6. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    Olympique Lyonnais
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    all discussions are current to me. beschuit may be twice baked, my way of thinking only half. i make no bones about that.

    actually i know sod all about friesland proper but i noticed a distinct tendancy in west-friesland (which is in noord-holland) for the je to degrade into ie.
     
  7. Caesar

    Caesar Moderator Staff Member

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    The mistake you made was assuming that the way you frogs define things is the right one.
     
  8. StiltonFC

    StiltonFC Viking Pineapple Presents

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    a buddy of mine told me that -- among Germans -- East-Friesland jokes are equivalent to Polish jokes among Americans. het difference is that the jokes are more absurd.

    par example: Why does the tide ebb and flow? – Because when the sea saw the East Frisians, it got such a shock that it ran away. Now it returns twice a day to see if they're still there!
     
  9. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    more to do with etymology but it's a semi-fair cop.
     
  10. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    east friesians i'f i'm not mistaken (always a dodgy proposition at the very best) are friesians who speak friesian but live in germany. west friesland is in holland and the people are not really friesians at all. in between there's proper friesland. in all these places when the tide goes out it really goes out.
     
  11. JohnR

    JohnR Member+

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    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    My German relatives loved that my mom's maiden name was Fries.
     
  12. Frieslander

    Frieslander Moderator Staff Member

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    This is true. The Frisians, at their greatest extent before the Franks started ruining their good time, controlled the land along the North Sea (what the Romans called the Frisian Sea) from south of Amsterdam all the way to Denmark.
     
  13. Funkfoot

    Funkfoot Member+

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    Location:
    Manassas, VA
    Passover - the festival of bad food. Blah.:(
     
  14. Moishe

    Moishe Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not that bad. I mean really, how can you not love some gifilte fish with horseradish? It is the original spam after ll:D
     
  15. Lithium858

    Lithium858 Member

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    Lamb is pretty good though.
     
  16. StiltonFC

    StiltonFC Viking Pineapple Presents

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    Back many years ago, I had some lamb sausage made by a Moroccan guy who had a stall in the Hakaniemi Market building in Helsinki. He went out of business, which was a tragedy ( maybe there were deaths involved ??? ). Also, I had lamb sausage pizza at Spago.

    Lamb, properly prepared, slays!
     
  17. billyireland

    billyireland Member+

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    May 4, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Oh, actually Australia's obsession with beef sausages. Not the worst thing in the world, but they don't even begin to compare to pork, and are just weird in a 'full Irish/English' type breakfast. The other day my Aussie flatmate told me the concept of pork sausages just seemed odd to her. As far as I am concerned, the argument involves sausage, the Germans are on my side, and hence, I am correct. End of discussion.

    I mean, it just makes no sense when you see a McDonalds ad on TV for a 'sausage mcmuffin' which involves: one bun on bottom, a slice of cheese, a disc-shaped slab of beef* and another bun on top. Now call me crazy, but what is the difference between the disc-shaped slab of beef in between two buns that makes a "sausage" mcmuffin, and the disc-shaped slab of beef in between two buns that makes a "burger"?

    It defies all fecking logic!

    *OK, so it's McDonalds, but lets assume it's beef for the sake of the argument.

    ---

    They also have chicken sausage in supermarkets, even more commonly than pork sausages. Nothing reminds you even nearly as efficiently as chicken sausage that indeed sausages are a combination of foot and anus scrapings from whatever animal, and ligament.
     
  18. johan neeskens

    johan neeskens Member

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    Jan 14, 2004
    You're kidding right? Straight out of secondary school I worked as an au pair for an English-jewish family and I loved passover! And I love matzes (with butter and sugar, yum...)

    Spring's the best time for food in general. I can't wait for the new local asparagus crop (I refuse to buy imported asparagus)
     
  19. johan neeskens

    johan neeskens Member

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    Jan 14, 2004
    Beschuit is lovely... It's also perfect for stacking cheese on on top of onion soup. As for hagelslag, having married into an English family, kids universally love chocolate sprinkles. It's not grownup food (even though I myself think a peanutbutter & hagelslag sandwich is fantastic, you probably won't agree as being French you're likely a pretentious food snob).

    Also muisjes are virtually uniquely eaten on the occassion of a newborn child. That's why it comes in two varieties, pink and baby blue.
     
  20. Caesar

    Caesar Moderator Staff Member

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    Location:
    Oztraya
    Pork sausages are bland as all heck compared to beef. That probably explains why the English and Irish like them so much.

    Chicken sausages are just a low-fat thing. They're not supposed to taste good.
     
  21. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    mermoz-les-boss
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    Olympique Lyonnais
    Country:
    France
    pindakaas* and hageslag is fine... but with real chocolate it's better.

    muisjes, babies... yes we know all about that. but gestampte muisjes?

    *btw, in our family we fear the local chinese shop running out of calvé met stuckies more than we fear nibiru.
     
  22. johan neeskens

    johan neeskens Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2004
    Why won't you raise up to my French pretentious food snob bait? This is v. disappointing Guignol.

    There's hagelslag and then there's hagelslag. You can get a ridulously expensive pure chocolate variety these days. I prefer vlokken though. Or Benco (the stuff you can make hot chocolate with).

    I just realised we've probably got to have the most ecclectic sandwich toppings in the world. Have you ever had coconut slices (kokosbrood) or caramel paste? Both are disgusting.
     
  23. billyireland

    billyireland Member+

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    May 4, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Beef sausages are the very definition of blandness, don't go with other flavourings (apple, spices, etc) as well, do't work as well in a hot-dog or breakfast, and tend to taste like dry cardboard. Which also doesn't help. It works OK at times, and beef sausage rolls are quite good, but it's just second best to pork sausages. The Germans agree, the argument involves sausages, and so any contrary opinion is futile. :)

    This is coming from somebody entirely convinced that beef/steak is the run-away king of all meats, also.
     
  24. johan neeskens

    johan neeskens Member

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    I'm not even sure I ever had a beef sausage. I thought all sausages were made of pork by definition!
     
  25. guignol

    guignol Moderator Staff Member

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    mermoz-les-boss
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    Olympique Lyonnais
    Country:
    France
    nog niet zo gek hoor!

    we've recently discovered speculoospasta and it's not bad.

    as i lived with vegetarians in holland we always had cashew butter and miso paste on the table for brood eten and both i found excellent.

    i was always one for mixing things, in fact i now remember that PB&H* that seemed so obvious to someone from the land of reese's peanut butter cups weirded my dutch friends out to no end...

    but less than sliced strawberries and GM**

    *peanut butter and hagelslag

    **gestampte muisjes
     
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