Player Eligibility and Switching National Teams: Case Studies & General Discussion

Discussion in 'FIFA and Tournaments' started by Nico Limmat, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. Rickdog

    Rickdog Member+

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    yep, that too.


    http://www.insideworldfootball.com/...-lifts-chile-level-argentina-2018-qualifiers/


    In Cabrera's case, he not only didn't have the 5 years of continuous residency, but also he was already capped for Paraguay.

    Bolivia's FA, on their own defence on the case, has insisted that the 5 year residence requirement is something that was not quite clear, as according to them in some FIFA papers and documents, it talks about only 2 years (to certain point, although wrong, this was debatable). What was undeniable though, was the fact Cabrera already had played for Paraguay before and never filed the one time switch, under FIFA' authority.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016

  2. rooboy91

    rooboy91 Member

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  3. Gibraldo

    Gibraldo Member

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    wow... i wonder what that means in regard of mongolia which lost the prequalifiers against them.

    they might plea at CAS, that they ve been illegally robbed from contending in AFC Qualifier Group A.
     
  4. rooboy91

    rooboy91 Member

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    They had the opportunity to make a complaint after their game. They didn't do that, so that would be the end of their case.
     


  5. Gibraldo

    Gibraldo Member

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    I understand that complaints must be raised immediately, but if AFC or FIFA weight a match with 0-3 as forfeit, this has an impact on tables and standings and the "table of 2" in the head to head vs mongolia would have had then mongolia being first and advancing to AFC group A
     
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  6. deejay

    deejay Member+

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    The term "one-time switch" is only for a player with a cap-tying FIFA youth tournament. They can file a one time switch but only if he was eligible for both nationalities at the time of the tournament.

    If a player has only played friendlies they are not cap-tied even if that was his only nationality at that date. He is still free to play for another country once he gets that nationality. However, the second country might want to make sure and have FIFA verify that he only played friendlies. This was what Spain did for Diego Costa (http://futbol.as.com/futbol/2013/09/25/seleccion/1380129055_899810.html). This is the smart thing to do given the complex residency requirements that are in the new rules.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
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  7. Rickdog

    Rickdog Member+

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    You have a small confussion.

    Youth level players don't require to have apply to the "one time switch" rule, as youth players can play for whichever teams they may hold certain allegiance to. The only requirement that FIFA puts in their cases, is that they must not play any competition or specific tournament at the same level, for 2 diferent teams, but whenever they change from one level to the next, they can change teams, as they wish. There are lots of players where while they were young players, they played for diferent NT's, at diferent age levels (some, inclusively could have played at the same level for 2 diferent teams, but on diferent tournaments).

    The cap-tie rule is restricted to senior level type of players, whom have played in any competition, being their last cap for any team, the one that counts for them (also the last youth level one, in an official competition).

    Contrary to most belief, some friendly matches, also does cap-tie players to the teams they played for, as most friendly matches are still, official A-level matches, only that this competition is restricted to the same match. Once the match finishes, the competition will have finished as well. And the number one rule concerning switch of players between diferent associations, is that players must never play for diferent teams in the same competition. Meaning that by only filing the switch to FIFA, with FIFA's aproval, the player can switch to a new team with no problem.

    In the case of Diego Costa, he never played at any youth level games for Brazil, and what in certain way cap-tied him to Brazil, was the fact he 1st was born there, and secondly that he had played a couple of friendly A-level matches for them, but as they were only friendly games, he could perfectly apply for the one time switch rule, by filing his case to FIFA, which the Spain FA did all perfectly accordingly to the rule book.

    In the case of Cabrera, he got cap-tied to Paraguay once he played for them in a friendly official A-level match at senior level, and one of the reasons (there were other issues as well) why he was unelegible to play for Bolivia is that the Bolivian FA, never filed his switch to FIFA.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  8. rooboy91

    rooboy91 Member

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    Going to CAS now won't change any of that.
     


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