qualities of a good center back

Discussion in 'Player' started by WN_Soccer10, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. WN_Soccer10

    WN_Soccer10 Member

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    Columbus Crew
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    what qualities/skills would you say are must haves for a center back to become dominant


  2. ranova

    ranova Member

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    Aug 30, 2006
    This is such a subjective subject, but must haves are all necessary skills to the position:
    tactical speed (decision making through execution)
    mental and physical toughness
    clearing high balls
    man-marking
    tackling
    vision and anticipation
    ball skills, especially passing and receiving
    strength, both upper and lower body
    above average height
    Quickness and speed off the ball are highly desireable, but not "must haves" beyond average for the level of play.
    leadership is highly desireable, but not a "must have."
  3. Utd16

    Utd16 Member

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    Yell, talk to your defenders. Be calm and composed, know when you need to step up and pressure.
  4. davoo

    davoo Member

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    as much as i hate to say that size matters, but in terms of CBs, it does matter. Must be able to hold your own against bigger strikers.


  5. Plechazunga

    Plechazunga New Member

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    Manchester United FC
    I also wish to know more about how to be a commanding centre half. My coach recently converted me to a center half (I am usually a fullback) and told me to emulate the style of Rio Ferdinand in the sense that I should focus on anticipation more than confrontation.

    I understand that in modern football, there are two center backs that work together to achieve a partnership. One is usually better on the ball and focuses mainly on intercepting passes and reading the game whereas the other is usually a hard man and tightly marks the main forward.

    Can any in house specialists give some tips on how to position, how to anticipate?
  6. davoo

    davoo Member

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    Manchester United FC
    well it depends if you play a stopper/sweeper set or a horizontal set.
    as a CB if you can disrupt the striker from making his run or receiving the ball, i would say half your job is done--keeping him from getting a flow for the game. When a striker cant make a direct contribution to his team, usually a good striker will make runs off the ball, so trying to stretch you out of play so it becomes 9v9 and not 10v9. Thereinlays the decision on your set and relationship with the other CB, you guys need to get that set early on and quickly.
    Technically,
    you should focus your training on jumping and heading (beat out opponents in the air), work on not getting dazzeled by dribbling (dont get tripped up), and work on getting strong, to bump and get the opponent off track and out of sync with the team
  7. rca2

    rca2 Member

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    Nov 25, 2005
    Being able to read the situation and anticipate where the players are going comes with playing experience. You can also learn by watching higher level matches. In person is better than TV because you can focus on the centerbacks and the opposing forwards.
  8. fstfrcrws

    fstfrcrws New Member

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    Jul 16, 2010
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    Manchester United FC
    What helps Cannavaro be such a successful central defender even with such a small stature? (Isn't he 5' 8" or 5' 9")
  9. davoo

    davoo Member

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    Manchester United FC
    strength and awareness
  10. ranova

    ranova Member

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    Aug 30, 2006
    He is not of "small stature." He is 5' 9", which is average height for Italy. An inch taller and he would be above average in height.
  11. GAIUSJULIUSCAESAR

    GAIUSJULIUSCAESAR New Member

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    Jul 17, 2010
    Hey guys im new here but I need to ask a question urgently.

    Im planning on buying puma sprints, they have the same shape as football shoes but without the large spikes. I tried using them and I can control the ball pretty well, but I am worried about slipping in mud.

    Does anyone know if they are more slip resistant compared to indoor football shoes?

    I dont wanna buy a spiked shoe since I have this habit of wearing them indoors and they break....
    I wanna save money and use something thats less of a hassle and you can go to school wearing them.


    A good centerback knows how an attacker thinks, like all the other dfs.
  12. rca2

    rca2 Member

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    Nov 25, 2005
    I don't know what you mean by spiked. You can buy flats (indoor), turf shoes, moldeds, or screw-ins. I would not bother with screw-ins. Most places close fields when they are muddy. On all synthetic surfaces you can use flats and turf shoes. On some synthetic fields you can use moldeds. Moldeds will slip less on grass fields than turfs and turfs will slip less on grass fields than flats. Flats are not really meant for grass fields. If you are playing on dry, poor grass fields (meaning mostly bare ground) turf shoes are best. Molded don't really help on hard dirt. You should not wear turf shoes (or molded or screw ins) anywhere except the soccer field.

    What all that means is if you are playing outdoors on synthetic fields, you can use your indoor shoes, although a turf shoe would be a bit better.
  13. GAIUSJULIUSCAESAR

    GAIUSJULIUSCAESAR New Member

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    Jul 17, 2010
    Thanks but I meant track shoes with the protruding circles on their heels.

    Will I slip? Will I have a hard time stopping?

    Puma sprints are track shoes sorry for not adding the extra info.
  14. rca2

    rca2 Member

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    Nov 25, 2005
    One thing you get with most soccer shoes is padding on the heel which offers some protection. In addition in soccer you do alot of stopping and turning, which places pressure on the back of the foot. The track shoes are not designed for that. They are designed just for running, absorbing shock on the front part of the foot.
  15. davoo

    davoo Member

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    Manchester United FC
    do not wear track shoes to play soccer.
    1) they will rip and tear VERY quickly, tranck shoes are meant to go one direction, straight and around slight corners
    2) almost the fastest way to break your foot, pressure from movements and otehr people stepping on them, they dont have the "protection"
    3) i cant imagine how someone would feel if you stepped on THEIR foot with your spikes
  16. joel20

    joel20 New Member

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    Arsenal FC
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    Netherlands

    For a Centerback in the professional leagues thats a little undersized. CBS range from about 5-11 on upwards to 6-5ish . Theres some big strong fowards in football and they gotta be able to hold them off. Cannavaro is so good even at his stature because hes very aggressive and exceptional in the tackle and in his positioning. hes very fiesty. He also has some hops which help him win alot of balls in the air. In the EPL most CBs are over 6 feet wiht few being under vermaelen, jagielka, mensah

    in all the professional soccer ive watched hes probably the shortest CB ive seen.
  17. blonjuan44

    blonjuan44 New Member

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    Chicago Fire
    Other than the shoe thing, this was a good, helpful thread in general..
  18. gigglemuffin

    gigglemuffin Member

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    Location:
    Salida, CA
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
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    United States
    Tenacity is key. Being aggressive not only allows you to win balls but also give you a psychological edge over the opposition. Fear is good but don't be too cards are not your friend.

    Being tall is not a requirement. Being good in the air is. Timing and anticipation are vital in the aerial side of the game and also tackling on the ground.

    Quick in mind and with your legs

    Learn how to jostle properly. Sometimes forcing pass or making a player uncomfortable by forcing them to their weaker foot is smarter than a tackle you aren't certain of.

    Always always go into tackles with 100% or more determination. Anything else will result in fouls/cards or injuries to yourself and the opposition.

    Someone said KISS, and they are absolutely correct. If you have the skill to dribble out of your own area do so only when ABSOLUTELY necessary, all the fancy tricks don't mean a damn thing if you lose the ball in a dangerous position and get scored on.

    Composure is key. Mistakes by forwards are fine if try score eventually, a mistake by a can result in a goal for the other team.

    Learn proper clearing technique with your feet and head

    Learning how to properly execute a slide tackle is key. Always use it as a last resort but when you have to do it you must be able toe execute with 100% confidence

    You must be able to pass efficiently and dribble reasonably well.

    Strength is also vital. You must be able to outmuscle the opposition and if not you must have probably the most important skill of all:

    ANTICIPATION!!! Reading the game and making interceptions is key to winning matches. Always be a step or two ahead of everyone. Always be aware of the position you are in relative to the field and the ball.

    That's all I got for now lol

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