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Discussion in 'Politics & Current Events' started by minerva, May 3, 2012.

  1. Auriaprottu

    Auriaprottu Member+

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    Dick LeBeau had waaaay (way, way, way) more than a "decent"/"good enough to hang around" NFL career. He's in the Hall because of his exploits on the field, not that he wouldn't qualify because of his expolits on the sideline. Art Shell is arguably (Munoz, Hannah) the greatest offensive lineman ever to play the game. Ditka's one of the top five or six tight ends in NFL history.
     


  2. Chris M.

    Chris M. Member+

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    I don't disagree with you main premise, but I would note that college has not been a better option based on race. Back when the Black Coaches Association began issuing its report card in 2004, there were only 3 head coaches of color at the 119 Division I programs. In the past couple of years, the number has increased quite a bit. I believe there were 19 last year. But traditionally, college was as bad or worse than the pros in terms of percentages and opportunities.
     
  3. jmartin1966

    jmartin1966 Member

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    I think the advances in equiment have madethis problem worse. Payers are so well protected and therefore show no restraint with their hits. But the increased protection does not stop the brain from moving inside the skull. Instead the brain is more likely to move because the hits have greater force. Also the problem is always becoming worse because in general each year's players are stonger and faster than the last.
     
  4. minerva

    minerva Member+

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  5. cleansheetbsc

    cleansheetbsc Member+

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    The poster boy of coaching disasters starts and ends with Isiah Thomas.
     
  6. Auriaprottu

    Auriaprottu Member+

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    Forgot about him. That really was a bad career move on his part...
     
  7. yellowbismark

    yellowbismark Member+

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    right, this isn't nerdy at all

    [​IMG]

    fupas are sexy too
     
  8. mcontento

    mcontento Member

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    Oh I know, I was just trying to somehow fit in the other guys who most people would look up and say, "He was a special team's player and reserve linebacker for 5 seasons."
     
  9. cleansheetbsc

    cleansheetbsc Member+

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    I know I quoted you earlier in this thread with a piece by Trevor Price about leaving the game. Here is one by George Koonce who did it as part of a doctorate at Marquette:

    http://espn.go.com/blog/nfcwest/post/_/id/65343/guest-column-surviving-life-after-the-nfl
     
  10. superdave

    superdave Member+

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    I dunno. It seems like most NFL coaches either call the defensive signals or the offensive plays. They X and O on one side of the ball.
     
  11. That Phat Hat

    That Phat Hat Member+

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    It's probably more true for college coaches, whose roles include fundraising, media relations and recruiting.
     
  12. Auriaprottu

    Auriaprottu Member+

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    You've convinced me about the differences. Koonce make a great point about there not being (m)any prodigies in the NFL, that greatness comes almost totally from the time you put in. I don't think many NFL ballcarriers could gain Barry Sanders' elusiveness simply thru hard work, but I get his point.

    But do we really want to hear or deal with the answer, which is ultimately to diminish the importance of the game itself? People treating it like a religion is what makes talented kids prepare for hours every day. Good luck finding the first relevant HS program that will agree to tone it down (starting at the home).

    Well, yeah, they still do that, but I meant that the guy who trains all or most of his life to hit folks may or may not be prepared for today's NFL coaching from the management/presser/interview standpoint. The guys they do take are usually capable of doing all that, even when it looks like they don't put much effort into much beyond Xs and Os (Belichick).

    There's obviously something working well the way they're doing it now- the only star player who's won a Super Bowl as a head coach is Ditka, OTTOMH. None of the coaching legends of the Super Bowl era (IMO, that would be Noll, Lombardi, Landry, Shula, Gibbs, Walsh, Parcells and Belichick) were star players. There have been top-caliber players who coached (Forrest Gregg, Art Shell, Ditka, maybe a couple others) but they didn't become coaching legends. And none of them played glamour positions.
     
  13. cleansheetbsc

    cleansheetbsc Member+

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    It is near impossible to be a pro without the work. Yes there are freaks like Randy Moss. But there are also there are many cases of a Marcus Dupree type of natural talent.

    Barry had an amazing sense. But then there was Emmit Smith who with hard work (and yes the Cowboys offensive line) and determination was able to match him yard for yard over a career.
     
  14. taosjohn

    taosjohn Member+

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    Landry wasn't a HOF player, and he moved up to coaching early-- but he was an All-Pro and Pro Bowler in 1954 and probably could have played at that level for several more years...

    Dan Reeves was quite a good player and a very successful coach-- should eventually make the HOF as a coach.

    Van Brocklin wasn't a coaching legend, but he had his moments, and he was definitely a star player.

    Probably not enough to disprove your thesis, though.
     
    Auriaprottu repped this.
  15. wallacegrommit

    wallacegrommit Member

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    Peyton Manning might as well be a coach. ;) Someone stole a bicycle from Seau's garage days after his death. Who does something like that?
     
  16. Auriaprottu

    Auriaprottu Member+

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    I forgot the Dutchman, probably because I never saw him play and because I was looking at coaches who'd won Super Bowls. The NFL has been around so long that I almost always try to limit my posts to the SB era. No excuse for Reeves- I knew he was a Cowboy, just forgot. Did not know Landry ever played.

    I'm gonna start asking you before I post about stuff that happened before my time. But yeah, I think I'm still right, for the most part.
     
  17. Minnman

    Minnman Member+

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    NFL Board Paid $2M to Players While League Denied Football-Concussion Link

     
  18. JohnR

    JohnR Member+

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    Winston-Salem's tobacco scientists are now splitting their time between advising the NFL and consulting to the Republican Party on climate change.
     
  19. Cascarino's Pizzeria

    Cascarino's Pizzeria Member+

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  20. yossarian

    yossarian Moderator Staff Member

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    As a former tobacco attorney, I can tell you that the scientists knew what they were doing.....that's why the corporate execs did their best to hide all those R&D reports from the 50s and 60s for as long as they could.
    :whistling:
     
  21. YankHibee

    YankHibee Member+

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    My roommates in law school were RJR scientists. They all quit smoking shortly after getting hired.
     
  22. Cascarino's Pizzeria

    Cascarino's Pizzeria Member+

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    They haven't translated their findings into foreign languages yet, have they?
     
  23. minerva

    minerva Member+

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    maybe not for the economically and socially disadvantaged youths, who see their god-given talents and physical abilities as their ticket to money and fame.
     
  24. Minnman

    Minnman Member+

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    Dr. Wankler repped this.
  25. Cascarino's Pizzeria

    Cascarino's Pizzeria Member+

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    The local paper had an article about Pop Warner and how the numbers have been declining in recent years because of concussions & other injuries. So who does the local league get to speak about safety? Why former RU player now paralyzed-for-life, Erik Legrande. :eek:
     

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