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Tackling technique in Rugby vs American Football

Discussion in 'Rugby & Aussie Rules' started by argentine soccer fan, Sep 10, 2007.

  1. argentine soccer fan

    argentine soccer fan Moderator Staff Member

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    Watching both rugby and the NFL on the same day, it is very obvious that the tackling technique is very different in each sport.

    I hope to hear from people to play either sport as to why they tackle the way they do, since the object in both cases is basically the same, to stop the ballcarrier.

    Of course, the rules are a bit different (like holding the shirt is allowed in rugby), and also the gear in football (helmets etc.) must make a difference.

    Basically, in rugby players tend to tackle low and wrap their arms around the opponent. In football you see players tackle high and more emphasys on a hard hit. But, you see a lot of football players bounce around and keep going after getting hit, you'd think a low tackle as is more common in rugby would be more effective to stop the ballcarrier.
     


  2. Matt in the Hat

    Matt in the Hat Moderator Staff Member

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    Because LB's and DB's in the NFL have forgotten how to properly tackle. Go back even 15 years and you will see a more "rugby style" defense.
     
  3. comme

    comme Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 21, 2003
    When I was a child playing rugby we were always coached to take the legs, because you can't run if someone has your legs.

    Technique is so important, because almost anyone can stop even the biggest player if your technique is right.

    Having never played American Football I have absolutely no idea why they don't tackle like that.
     
  4. PsychedelicCeltic

    PsychedelicCeltic New Member

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    One of the reasons is the importance of territory.

    In rugby, territory has no importance in and of itself, unless you cross a certain line. So if a guy stretches out and gets an extra half metre while being tackled that's no big deal. In football, that's the difference between a first down and punting.

    There's also a fear factor involved. You wouldn't go in head first like a lot of football players did if you had no padding up there.
     


  5. Dead Penguin

    Dead Penguin New Member

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    It is partly the rules, in rugby you can't simply charge into the ball carrier, you need to make some attempt to wrap your arms around them.

    The objectives of tackling are slightly different in each sport, in American football once the tackle is made the ball is dead and the game stops and restarts, so preventing the ball carrier making distance is the only thing that matters. In rugby once a tackle is made the ball is still in play so bringing down your opponent in such a way that your team is better placed to win control of the ball is useful. There might be other reasons but that must be one of them.
     
  6. the shelts

    the shelts Member

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    Agreed 100 percent, when I was a kid it was the same thing. Just take the feet out and have good technique and you're all set.

    Problem is US football since John Maddens Oakland Raiders and his All-Madden team phenom of POPPING someone is now all over the league. Just like US Basketball has descended to individual dunks and "being the man" the football being taught now is what they call "smashmouth" football (which is where the band got the name) and not a fundamental style of how to take down someone.

    Gone are the days when watched the legs and tackled the hips, now you get up a head of steam, launch yourself into the mans chest and "POP" him John Madden style.

    Not to disrespect Madden either, he is actually as knowledgeble rugby guy as you will find in Gridiron football. He says rugby is his third favorite sport after football and Canadian football. He also knows the differences between Rugby Union and League. That game 2-3 years ago in Philadelphia when the Roos played the USA on their way home from the RL World Cup in Britain, he was in the broadcast booth.
     
  7. condor11

    condor11 Moderator Staff Member

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    the tackling technique in rugby league is more similar to american football

    got to remember that apart from bringing the guy down, ideally you want to be in a position to contest the ball legally aswell
     
  8. Liv'poolFaninAZ

    Liv'poolFaninAZ New Member

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    You beat me to it. I never played football in High School, but recently I started practicing with a Rugby Club here in Phoenix and I actually am not afraid to be tackled, where as in American football I would'nt dream of letting someone come at me from a set position, wearing pads nail me full speed. Rugby is a flowing game, unlike American Football wich stops and starts. In Rugby, the guy tackling you has also been running as much as you and is equally tired, since all he has to do is stop you and not prevent you from gaining yardage, all he has to do is grab your legs. In American football, with the set defences waiting for you to go into their territory to catch a pass you can be blindsided by a strong safety who figured out the play and is just waiting for you to catch the ball, since you are running into his territory, all he has to do is wait, gain momentum and smash right into you when you're the one that's been running. American Football is far more dangerous because of the forward pass and the set plays. Also the padding gives the football players a sense of invincibility which gives them the overconfidence to throw their bodies around with wreckless abandon.

    All that being said, I've fallen in love with this Rugby game and am currently trying to lose some weight so I can be faster and ready to join this club come next season.
     
  9. RichardL

    RichardL BigSoccer Supporter

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    out of curiousity, is the result of this that tackling, rather than being tackled, is actually much more dangerous?

    you hear of a lot of people getting neck/spinal injuries. I'd have thought that going in head first would be more likely to cause that than being hit.
     
  10. Liv'poolFaninAZ

    Liv'poolFaninAZ New Member

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    I really thing that it's split 50/50. I think I've seen injuries from both, however now that you mention it, it seems that the taclers seem to be more prone to spinal injuries and the players being tackled run the risk of getting more head injuries. Either way I love ALL football and I watch American football as well, but I would never play a real game, with pads and evrything. Flag football is as far as I venture. I would much rather play Rugby and I can't wait till next season!
     

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