1. Save 40-80% on great soccer jerseys. Shop today at BigSoccer Shop!

Teaching the Counter Attack

Discussion in 'Coach' started by cwillia3, Apr 20, 2012.

Moderators: elessar78
  1. cwillia3

    cwillia3 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    How do you teach counter attacking movements? Do you have specifically designed movements and runs ?
     


  2. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    To what age?

    My U12s scored two counter attack goals this past weekend. I attribute it to playing a lot of the "end zone game" in the practices leading up to this past weekend.
     
  3. cwillia3

    cwillia3 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    High School Boys, pretty high skill level.
     
  4. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Oh even better! How do you train in the transition from defense to attack phase? Do they know their roles in this phase by position?

    The main rule I go by is that is they need to read on the run. Say, you win possession off a corner and make the outlet pass into the middle third (and receiver is able to turn upfield). This is the trigger that signals the counterattack is on. Players are looking for the trigger and start making their runs upfield if they see it.

    Three or 4 players involved in the attack, any more and a sloppy pass could doom you the other way (not enough cover). Functionally, it allows the runs in the channels to be spaced better and gives the POTB enough choices but not too many (leads to confusion and slower decisionmaking). Other players can follow the play, but know they are primarily there in case the ball is lost or played behind a frontrunner. Key point is to tell these runners to keep running to goal or endline until the ball is lost—you never know how the movement will end up. GKs sometimes make the initial save but spill a rebound.

    I'd have a "designed run" for a central channel and an outer channel outlet, depending on where the ball is won initially.

    There's also some cues on how the opponents' defenders are positioned closer to their goal, to determine if the counter is on, but what's the harm in getting out in transition fast and into the middle third? Worst case you just go back to build up play.
     


  5. nicklaino

    nicklaino Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    To make a counter work you need space, speed, skill amd practice.

    You have to get the pass off no latter then the third touch. If you can't get it off by then it is probably to late to work.

    Look at the team your playing while they still have the ball. Is their a hole of space you can attack ball side if they lose the ball. Let's say they attack a back ball side and they don't over shift those other backs into that space where their back left to attack. If they don't where the back left is your target space to hit on your counter.

    Look at their team on defense if their backs are not spaced well and they are not staggarded for depth you can hit your counter any where. If they are spaces well and staggard ball side. Then make a long cross on the first touch or the second touch and counter from that side of the field on your third touch.

    Best weather conditions for a counter is when the wind is blowing out and not blowing in towards your players.

    If the wind is blowing in first pass in the counter is undernaeth their backs. and not over the heads of their backs. Then the second pass is over the top of their backs.
    ----------------------
    After you score and get the lead it is a good idea to bring everyone back, and frustrate the opponent into a bunker style of play. When they get impatient and start to push players up recklessly so they leave holes space to attack.

    Then if you have speed, skill, space and practiced counter the opponent goes from 0-1 to 0-2.

    The time your most likely to let in a goal is right after you scored a goal. So witching to bunker and counter after you score at least for 10 minutes will keep that from happening we hope.

    Team defense no matter what style you play is very important for your teams confidence.

    If you can keep the opponents shots on goal down your good shape defensively. If you have an organized defense and leave no holes (space) for them to attack your in very good shape defensively. If you leave no holes (space) to attack when your team has the ball. Then if you should lose the ball they have no space to attack. Then your a bitch to beat.

    Your players know that they have confidence when they have the ball. They also know if they get a head 1-0 the chances are good they can win the game.
     
  6. rca2

    rca2 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    This is worth repeating. I agree with Nick's whole post, but would say it differently (meaning is the same).

    A quick counter is all about penetration. That first pass needs to put opponents out of the play. Speed of play is needed to keep the opponents out of the play. That is how you get numbers up on the defense.

    Someone else talked about the maximum number of players running into a forward position. As a coach planning counters, you want to include in your plan at least 3 players getting forward (for width and depth). My preference is for the first off the ball runner to add width and the second off the ball runner to add depth.
     
Moderators: elessar78

Share This Page