Team-Building Exercises

Discussion in 'Coach' started by Twenty26Six, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. Twenty26Six

    Twenty26Six Feeling Sheepish...

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    I know that a lot of you have many years of good coaching experience. :)

    What sort of team-building exercises have you employed with young boys and girls over the years?


  2. Kevin8833

    Kevin8833 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Location:
    Estero, FL
    I've been wondering about this too. Only two team building exercises I know of are the numbers game where players dribble around, coach calls out a number and they must get into groups of that given number. Then there is the red ass game that someone just mentioned on here that may be worth trying, put players into two groups, one group lines up across the goal and the other group shoots at them and tries to hit them in the ass.
  3. Twenty26Six

    Twenty26Six Feeling Sheepish...

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    Yea. I know those two - especially "red ass" (which they use at UNC w/ Dorrance actually). :)

    But, I've got 11 year old girls. I won't be playing any "red ass" with them. :D
  4. ranova

    ranova Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    I don't use any specific drill. I build a group identity from the start by using standard ploys--having each kid introduce themselves and tell something about them; having the kids chose a name for the team; chose a team cheer; uniforms (usually arranged you by the club); presenting team (the coaches in reality) objectives; keep my discussions in terms of the "team" rather than individuals; and preventing cliques from forming by managing how you assign people to groups. I allow talking and joking during practices as long as its respectful and not disruptive. The social interaction is especially important to girls. The normal soccer activites are inherently group activities. Even when practicing individual skills, we do it as a group. Even circuit training can feel like a group exercise. So as long as you don't allow cliques to form the team identity will develop in a positive way.


  5. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    One that I like to do after all the training is done is "Cross Bar Challenge". If you have seen Soccer AM clips, you will know what I am talking about.

    [youtube]T-V_rxfQJhw[/youtube]

    Depending on how old the kids are, you can set a point for the shot and have them lineup to take shot. It's more fun with younger kids, especially if they are getting to know each other. The coach can participate too. I usually play if someone can hit the crossbar before me they get a Gatorade (no smart comments 26).

    But, you make them say their name, position, and then something about themselves. Pick a category like favorite food, movie, hobby. Or even something like the school they go to or where they went on their last vacation.

    It helps you get your team a little better, and it helps your team get to have fun and know each other a bit better.
  6. Grinners89

    Grinners89 BigSoccer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    Australia
    You should watch the Chelsea crossbar challenge, especially the part where Avram Grant has a go :D
  7. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    I wish LFC would have one. But that is OT for this forum. :)
  8. Kyle787

    Kyle787 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Club:
    --other--
    Country:
    United States
    well i suggest a trust fall activity. You find a large sturdy wooden box about 5-6 feet high and you have one kid stand backwards with arms crossed and eyes closed, fall back off the box where 8 team mates will catch him/her.
  9. Th4119

    Th4119 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Location:
    Annandale, VA
    Here's a great one if you're near a rural area:

    Pack all of the kids up in a van and tell them you're going to a game a couple hours away. Once you get to a really desolate area leave the main roads and have the kids all get out. Then, speed away.

    The kids will then be on their own in the wilderness and have to learn to trust each other to get back to civilization. Some of the weaker kids may be left behind (or cannibilized for the rest of the group's survival) but in the end those were probably the kids you were going to cut eventually anyway.

    It's undeniable that the surviving members of your team would be bonded for life and I'm sure that bond would represent itself on the soccer field in a positive manner.




























    Seriously, if you even thought this was for real...
  10. Twenty26Six

    Twenty26Six Feeling Sheepish...

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    Neeeeeeext!!! :)
  11. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    I think if you have an older team, a team outing is always a good way to build team togetherness and teamwork.

    When I played my team used to do the whole team dinners thing. But once in awhile we would all go to someone's house and play video games or watch a USA WCQ match.

    Team-building exercises are more important for a team that comes from a wider area, or a team that is made up of different age groups (ie high school varsity team).
  12. Twenty26Six

    Twenty26Six Feeling Sheepish...

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    I've got U11 girls... any other suggestions? :)
  13. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    Paintball. :D
  14. Twenty26Six

    Twenty26Six Feeling Sheepish...

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    I think I'll just skip that and stage a knife fight.
  15. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    Even better. It will toughen them up for the brutal tackles delivered at that age group.

    But seriously.

    I think you might want to try team-building exercises that don't involve soccer at all. That's a pretty obvious and general statement.

    Here is an activity you could do.

    Depending on numbers, have your girls circle up. Groups of 10-12 would be the biggest you would want it.

    Then have them all get in close, and stick out their hands, and grab another hand. They have to grab someone's hand that isn't standing next to them.

    Once they have all done this they will be tangled up good. Now, they have to try and untangle themselves without breaking the chain.
  16. JoseP

    JoseP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2002
    I used to take my team to the mall, break them into 2 groups and have a scavenger hunt. The list looks something like this:

    1.) This store has what written on the back wall?

    2.) Go to this sports store and have all the players running on the treadmill. Take a picture as proof.

    3.) Here is $5. Bring me back the goofiest t-shirt you find.

    You get the picture.

    Then you can retreat to a bar and offer extra points if they find you still sober.
  17. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    For 11 year olds? :D
  18. equus

    equus Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2007
    For the Ulittles, one game that worked well was Blob Tag, in which two players lock arms and have to chase the other players who are dribbling around an area. If tagged, the ball goes out and they join the blob until you have 10 players with locked arms trying to maneuver to catch the last couple of players.

    I did this for the first couple of practices since none of them had played together. They were laughing and working together right off the bat. It took the edge off of meeting new people for the first time.

    Another we did was Swedish Handball. Two teams, pass the ball with their hands but can't run with the ball, and try to throw it into the Pugg goals to score. Defenders can intercept passes but can't take the ball away from a player already in possession. Kind of like ultimate frisbee. They enjoyed it and it helped with learning spacing and teamwork.
  19. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    This game is a great game!

    I use this exact game in warm-ups and as a fun cool-down exercise.

    I suppose it also builds the team.

    The only difference I do is how the teams score. To score, the team with the ball has to move it down the field and then pass to a teammate in the endzone. Then they turn around and try and score on the other side.
  20. Th4119

    Th4119 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
    Location:
    Annandale, VA
    I like this game, too. I add another element for my older teams in which teams score by heading a thrown ball to another teammate. If they can combine multiple headers in a row, multiple points.

    I've had excellent results getting kids who were terrified of heading the ball much better at it with this and it also adds a soccer element to an already fun game.
  21. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    I think the most important thing to teach younger kids is how to have fun with their teammates. Sometimes it's really easy to laugh at someone, but younger kids take that to heart.

    My team is good with that, they laugh with each other and have fun without hurting each other's feelings too badly.

    I make a simple rule. I can make fun of them. They can make fun of me. They can't make fun of their teammates. Exceptions are made for players who are friends.
  22. ROSSIGA

    ROSSIGA Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Indiana
    We end a lot of practices for our U-10's by dividing the boys up into two teams to shoot PK's. The teams rotate shooting and each shooter becomes the goalkeeper. The winning team shoots at the coaches or losing team in game of "redass" ("target practice" for our kids) afterwards. The kids enjoy rooting for and against each other and especially shooting at the coaches.

Share This Page