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The Historical place you dream of visiting and Why?

Discussion in 'History' started by Rick B, Oct 13, 2005.

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  1. Rick B

    Rick B Member

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    So where is it in the world that you have always read about, maybe dreamed you could re-create those battle scenes or imagine you are standing there as a historical event takes place? Is it a building or just a hill? For everyone there will be somewhere that they would love to visit to imagine how it used to be.
    So tell us all......

    For me it's something a bit unusual. Although I have always been interested in post war European history there is a building that as soon as I saw it in a photo when I was 11 or 12 I decided I wanted to know more. It's one of the oldest mosques in Africa and is made completly of mud. It's traditions go back to the old Islamic trading routes through Timbuktu and onwards to North Africa. It is the Djenne Mosque in Mali, North West Africa. It's the largest mud-brick building in the world, it was built in the 13th Century and re-built after falling into disrepair in the 19th Century.

    It finally looks like I am going as I am in the midst of organising a trip to Mail in January.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  2. IntheNet

    IntheNet New Member

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    Rick... When I was very young, I read about the American Civil War constantly... I recreated the battles in my mind, looking at troop deployments from both a Union and Confederate perspective... and the one site I wanted to visit was always the same: Antietam! I imagined it was September 17,1862 all over again and the cornfields were ripe. Antietam was both the most costliest battle in lives lost in a single day, 23,000, yet as a contributory result of the Battle of Antietam, the Emacipation Proclamation was issued by President Lincoln. As a measure of comparison, nine times as many Americans were killed or wounded at Antietam (23,000 soldiers) as took place on June 6, 1944--D-Day in Normandy!

    I have visited Antietam often; each time measuring the battlefield in different perspectives... It is a quiet battlefield; little development mars the landscape and it is out of the way of the commercialism that other histioric sites are forced to contend.

    Should you have an afternoon free, visit Antietam....

    [​IMG]
    Alexander Gartner Photo: [Confederate dead on the east side of the Hagerstown Pike near the hill where the Visitor Center is located today, with the photographer looking toward the Dunker Church]

    [​IMG]
    Modern Photo of Battlefield Illumination: The Memorial Illumination is held on the first Saturday in December at Antietam. 1,000 volunteers place and light 23,000 candles in paper bags across the battlefield. Each candle represents a soldier that was killed or wounded during the battle. Visitors drive through an awesome reminder of the magnitude of loss at Antietam.
     
  3. pething101

    pething101 Member

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    [​IMG]

    Not sure I will ever get there though.
     
  4. odessit19

    odessit19 Member

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    Was there 3 months ago - Israel that is. Jerusalem was always on the top of my list and regardless of your religion or whether you are not religious at all - Jerusalem has some vibe, especially the Old City, that can't be explained. Every brick, every corner, every inch of that soil has something holy. It was truly amazaing.

    Stalingrad, which is now Volgograd is on top of my list as well - a city/battle which many believe was the turning point in WWII. In that one single battle 2 million people died, the battle lasted 6 months and it might have beem just the greatest, most important event in the last half of 20th century, since a lot might be different now of not for Soviet victory.
     


  5. minorthreat

    minorthreat Member

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    I'm fascinated by the idea of visiting Mecca. However, as a non-Muslim, I can't enter.
     
  6. odessit19

    odessit19 Member

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    You can then go to Jerusalem and visit all the Jewish holy places and no one will tell you "NO" ;)
     
  7. Bluto11

    Bluto11 The sky is falling!

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    i'm going to have to think about this one. i'll post later. my mind is going in to a million different places
     
  8. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator Staff Member

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    Rick, that's a fantastic pick. I don't think I can narrow it down like that. I also need to think on this, although for a lot of reasons I'm tempted to pick Srebrenica.
     
  9. Bluto11

    Bluto11 The sky is falling!

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    I'm going to have to go with the beaches at Anzio. My grandfather landed there and fought there. I've been to Italy, but didn't get to go to Anzio. He never really talked about him fighting in the war, but would talk about other battles and things he wasn't involved in. He landed in southern France to and was shot in the butt by a sniper of sorts, the million dollar wound.


    I've also always wanted to see Gallipoli, especially on Anzac Day.
     
  10. nicephoras

    nicephoras BigSoccer Supporter

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    The one place I'd wanted to go I've been to several times (Rome), so its what I haven't seen that I'd like to visit, I guess. In which case its definitely Istanbul with Athens second.
     
  11. dfb547490

    dfb547490 New Member

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    Wow I could write a book on this.

    Nicephoras, I was just in Istanbul, it's simply amazing. A large part of the Blue Mosque was under renovation unfortunately so I didn't get to see all of that, but it was still a great time. Interestingly enough my hotel looked right out over the Besiktas stadium (which is gorgeous BTW, one end is built into a hill and the other looks out over the Bospurus) and we were able to watch a game from the hotel room!!

    Similar to what Bluto said I'd go with the beaches at Normandy. My grandfather landed there, not on D-Day but about 2 weeks after. I actually have been but I was about 5-6 years old so I don't really remember it.

    Another place I haven't been since I was little, that I definitely want to go to, is Valley Forge. I went there when I was about 7 and have driven through the park since then (beautiful drive) but never actually took time to get out and walk around--simply inexcusable seeing as how I grew up 10-15 minutes away. That's definitely something I'm doing one day when I go back to Philly for Christmas. I have been to Gettysburg and the Independence Hall/Liberty Bell area several times though. By the same token, I walked the Freedom Trail in Boston in the first weekend I was here freshman year--I'm definitely heading back before I graduate, probably sometime next spring, since I've taken a lot of American history courses since then and will be able to appreciate it more fully.

    Also got to go to Vietnam with my dad about 5 years ago and actually got to see the dock where his LST was stationed in Vung Tao (it's a commercial dock now) which was incredible.

    As for someplace I haven't been at all yet, I'd have to say Israel and Egypt.
     
  12. Anthony

    Anthony Member

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    I think Istanbul is number one on my list. I have developed this interest in Byzantine history, do I would love to see the Land Walls, Haigi Sophia, and th rest.

    Number two is Machu Pichu (though I here all these New Age types hang out there now and harass tourists).

    For some reason, I also want to see the ruins of Anitoch, though I understand not much is left of the ancient city. Maybe I'll combine it with my trip to Istanbul.
     
  13. yasik19

    yasik19 Moderator Staff Member

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    Definitely Machu Pichu and Cuzco for me in South America. In Middle East, it has to be Jerusalem and Massada.

    And then this - Petra

    [​IMG]

    And in Europe, definitely Venice and Florence and Athens and Seville and Cordoba.
     
  14. Anthony

    Anthony Member

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    How could I foget Petra. A friend of mine who is in Iraq right now sent me a postcard from Petra.



    Been to Florence. Frankly, it felt like a Renissance theme park. All the historical sites are right next to each other, and everyone there is a tourist. For me, part of travel is to see how real people live. I liked Sienna better.

    I spent part of my honeymoon in Cordoba. We stayed in a hotel acrss the street form the Mequite. Incredible city. Friendly people. Great food. Good sangria. And the locals claim it as the spiritual home of Flameco. (If there, see a show).
     
  15. Bluto11

    Bluto11 The sky is falling!

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    yasik, great choice in Petra. totally forgot about that. Think the holy grail is still there? :p
     
  16. yasik19

    yasik19 Moderator Staff Member

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    I totally agree with Anthony about traveling. I really really want to go and see how different nations live, and not just the tourist attractions. But at the same time, before i can go and explore each country thoroughly, i also want to see the usual stuff and that's why i mentioned Venice and Florence.
    I just came back from Bangkok and I really liked it. If anyone is going there, go visit Ancient City and Ayuthaya.
     
  17. yasik19

    yasik19 Moderator Staff Member

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    :eek: Don't make me unleash Mr. Dan Brown on you. :D
     
  18. nicephoras

    nicephoras BigSoccer Supporter

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    Its next on my list of things to see. I usually take one long vacation each year (this year it was Portugal), so this looks likely. It'll also be easier since I'll be based out of England next year.

    I'd prefer to see Damascus, although that ain't happening. In terms of cities of which there isn't much left, I'd much rather see Dara Europus, but again, now's not the best time. I'm almost certainly going to travel along Turkey's western coast to see cities like Izmir, the evidence of the 2500 year old Greek presence in Anatolia, and I'm toying with the idea of visiting Trabzon.

    You must have gone in August. And while Florence is by far the least natural experience in Italy, it has such a collection of art that you can't really compare it to Siena. Michalangelo's David is worth that trip alone, nevermind the Uffizi.

    Masada is an interesting experience, although, frankly, the most interesting stuff there is the well preserved legionary camp. The actual Masada story is not one that displays Jews in a very favorable light. It used to be a required place to visit for all Israelis in high school - its not anymore.
     
  19. odessit19

    odessit19 Member

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    Yeah, Petra was amazing - totally different than anything I have ever seen. I mean there were actual writings in Aramaic - first language!
    I also have to go with Japan and China - so much history, such different culture, so many people that can kick my ass using their mandatory, martial arts educational skills.
     
  20. Anthony

    Anthony Member

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    When I was about 8 I went to Panama with my aunt and uncle. Even at that young age I could tell something was seriously wrong there.

    So I have a rule. I will not visit any country (except if it is work related and I have no choice) which has a totalitarian or authoritarian or theocratic government (other than theVatican of course, and maybe Mount Athos, but those are special cases)


    Actually, I was there in May. I did not go to the Uffizi, there were ther things I wanted to see, such as David and to climb the bell tower.

    The legionary camp you say? Great, I can go visit the home of my ancestors! ;)

    Actually, one really cool place to visit is Brugge, Belgium. It was once a major trading and political center, then quickly became a backwater. So it has some incredible buildings and monuments, and looks frozen in time from about 1500.

    Oh, and being Belgium, the beer is half decent. Though when entering a local pub, you should always ask for a Budweiser.
     
  21. Bluto11

    Bluto11 The sky is falling!

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    but, but, but....the Valley of the Cresant Moon
     
  22. yasik19

    yasik19 Moderator Staff Member

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    in all honesty, one place that i would really love to visit and should already have, is Saint-Petersburg. Who ever been there always find the city on Neva amazing.

    Also, Brazil has a city named João Pessoa that i want to visit. It's supose to be the oldest city in Brazil.

    BTW, how come noone mentioned India? I'm sure there are ton of interesting things to see there.
     
  23. Bluto11

    Bluto11 The sky is falling!

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    i could have a list of ten things, but i just picked the one i really want to go to
     
  24. nicephoras

    nicephoras BigSoccer Supporter

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    I'm not especially welcome in places like that, so its not generally an issue. ;)

    Well, if you like early Rennaisance art, the Uffizi simply can't be beat. Boticelli, Rafael, Leonoard, Corregio, etc. etc.

    It was really a very impressive achievement of engineering and perseverence to get up to Masada.

    Oh, I've been to Brugge. Their beer is ********ing potent.
     
  25. Metroweenie

    Metroweenie New Member

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    If you go, definitely stay at the one hotel that is actually at the site. If you do you basically have the ruins to yourself for a few hours, you can also get an early start in the morning. It is really crowded between about 10 and 4, so that is when you want to either be taking you first tour or doing one of the hikes.

    Seriously, if you go just spend the money. I don't think the hotel was too expensive by our standards, just a lot more than the very inexpensive places in the nearby town. I can't imagine having gone all that way to see it along with a thousand other people, when for a little more money you can be there with only a handful of other people for a few hours.

    There were a few New Age types around, but they were all pretty harmless. I laughed my ass off when I saw some hippy in Cusco, who didn't appear to have showered for days (or washed his hair in months) tapping on a bongo drum. But Cusco is really cool too.

    I'd like to do the Inca Trail hike from Cusco to Macchu Picchu, but the train ride is cool too.
     
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