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The italian music thread

Discussion in 'Italy' started by sardus_pater, Dec 5, 2004.

Moderators: Dante, DDR, Il Ciuccio
  1. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    Yes I know many of you knows him already... but I think he is a good start.

    My intention is to post here portraits (mostly copy&paste from various internet sources) of the best italian musicians, songwriters etc. (IMHO of course) when I feel like to.

    I hope the most curious amongst BS people will appreciate. :)

    [​IMG]

    PAOLO CONTE

    http://www.swonderful.net/biogart/biogart.htm

    Paolo Conte was born, grew up, and is to this day a most illustrious citizen of Asti, a small city in the north-western Italian region of Piedmont.
    Though internationally synonymous with the names Martini and Cinzano, nothing could be more misleading. For the wine drunk by town and country folk alike is the dark red Barbera which it is not unheard of to find even in the soups and local pasta dishes. This is that part of Piedmont where you can begin to notice a thickening in certain French traits, just as you acknowledge more and more the presence of the Franco-Italian Alps

    (...)

    Such was also the case of one Paolo Conte, born on 6 January 1937 into a family of solicitors that for generations has practised in the town centre.
    Though he grew up in the city he spent a fair amount of time, particularly during the war, on his grandfather's country farm and would later recall his upbringing as particularly favourable to an understanding and respect not
    just for people of all walks of life but also for his own local ways and traditions.

    Aspects of musicality

    Whenever asked to comment on the relationship between words and music in his compositions, Paolo Conte has no doubts in attributing to his music the more crucial role, that of "regista" (director) as he puts it, without fail considering the lyrics somewhat as adjuncts or qualifiers. This may not always be apparent from the final result, where apart from the natural prominence of the vocal line, the two appear magically intertwined and completely interdependent; but unlike some singer-songwriters, and regardless of all the praise heaped on his lyrics, his first and foremost interests have never been other than musical.

    Not only does he come from a jazz tradition where he quite typically practised purely instrumental forms, he also spent a large part of his early songwriting career composing purely for the lyrics of others, before seemingly being forced into writing his own, out of the need to adequately mirror what the music was communicating. Even then he continued to explore the possibilities of purely instrumental composition through his theatre and film scores, on a number of occasions reusing previously recorded songs after stripping them of their words. These might very well have been carefully and painstakingly constructed for their context but they could still be discarded if ever necessary.

    (...)

    In other instances, phonic considerations pervade the lyrics to the point of contributing with their musical-evocative function as much, if not more, to the context as the meanings themselves, as is plainly the case of La negra (1987): "Ti cerca una negra…/al telefono un attimo…/ma l'ombra e` ambra…" and "… l'anima e` magra…/in questa giostra pigra" (There's a black girl looking for you…on the phone a moment…but the shadow is amber…and the soul is thin…in this lazy ride) or Gratis (1981): "Via da questa mischia,/ c'e` qualcuno che cincischia…/ma la storia se ne infischia…" (Outside of this milling crowd, there's someone muttering/pottering about, but history doesn't give a damn).


    http://www.swonderful.net/bguide/bguide.htm

    In my opinion there are two records in particular which you must have before you can consider buying anything else and these are Aguaplano (1987), the perfect bridge between classic and later Conte, and Concerti (1985) a live double album that sums up, the lawyer’s progress until then. If you don’t understand Italian, you’ll have to add a third, The Best Of Paolo Conte (1998) only because it contains indispensable, if cursory, translations to important songs. Afterwards those who want to take the earlier direction should probably acquire Paris Milonga (1981) or Appunti Di Viaggio (1982) then fill in the gaps, and those who want to take the later direction should get hold of 900 (1992) or Una Faccia In Prestito (1995).


    http://www.prms.org/around/spotlight/conte.shtml

    MP3 samples

    Via con me.
    http://www.lydiaandmichele.com/Paolo Conte - Via Con Me [French Kiss Soundtrack].mp3

    Blue tangos

    Come di
     


  2. sarabella

    sarabella BigSoccer Supporter

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    Thanks for this thread. I hope to see more, I love Italian music.
     
  3. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    Was looking for a picture of Adriano Cellentano but I can't find any on the net.
     
  4. sarabella

    sarabella BigSoccer Supporter

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    per te...

    [​IMG]
     


  5. tomo

    tomo New Member

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  6. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    grazie ;)
     
  7. Soju Gorae

    Soju Gorae New Member

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    Lorenzo Jovanotti - He's like the Italian version of Jamiroquai/Beck. It's the best way I can describe this dude. His songs are a mix of hip-hop, alternative, funk, soul, and acoustics.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Funky Groove and Piove are my fav tracks of his.
     
  8. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    I especially like L'ombelico del mundo. Always gets me dancing.
     
  9. Labdarugo

    Labdarugo Member

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    Another musical world to explore! Woo-hoo! :)
     
  10. tomo

    tomo New Member

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  11. caliban

    caliban Member

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    [​IMG]
    Gianlugi Trovesi. His cd From G to G is great.
     
  12. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    Celentano, Jovanotti and others will come... :)

    [​IMG]

    FABRIZIO DE ANDRE'

    http://www.italica.rai.it/eng/principal/topics/bio/deandre.htm

    http://www.bielle.org/fabriziodeandre/

    http://www.viadelcampo.com/html/tribute_to_fabrizio_de_andre.html

    Fabrizio de André was born in Genoa on 18. February 1940. His father welcomed him to the world by playing Gino Marinuzzi's "Country Waltz" on the home grammophone. Twenty-five years later, Fabrizio de André would set his "Waltz for a Love" to the same tune.
    When the war broke out, the De Andrés had to seek refuge in a country farm near Revignano d'Asti, in Piedmont. Fabrizio's father, who was an Anti-fascist and was pursued by the police, joined the Maquis. In 1945 the De Andrés came back to Genoa. Fabrizio went to the primary school, first at the Marcellian Sisters' School and, later, at the Cesare Battisti public school. He attended then the Gymnasium and, after his school-leaving examination, he enrolled in the Law faculty of the University of Genoa; but he did not graduate (when only six examinations were left, he gave up).
    Fabrizio de André had a strong feeling for music; he practised first the violin, then the guitar, and joined a number of local jazz bands (jazz was his "first love"). His career as a songwriter and performer began in the late fifties, under the strong influence of the French chansonniers, especially Georges Brassens (1921-1981), whose songs he admirably translated into Italian and sung together with his first own songs.

    (...)

    Fabrizio de André's first LP, "Volume I", was issued a short time later (1968), followed by "Tutti morimmo a stento" ("All of us died with pain") and "Volume II"; both LP's reached soon the top of the Italian hit-parade.

    In 1970 Fabrizio de André wrote "La Buona Novella", a concept album based on Christ's life as told in the Apocrypha.

    This album, and especially the song "Il Testamento di Tito" ("Titus' Will")*, in which one of the thieves crucified together with Jesus confutes violently the Ten Commandments, was a serious "blow". Fabrizio de André, who was an atheist and an
    anarchist, had written a number of songs (like "Preghiera in Gennaio", "A Prayer in January", and "Si chiamava Gesù", "His name was Jesus") in which he showed a Christian-like spirit, and these songs were also sung in parishes and Churches; "Titus' Will"* was not.

    In 1971 Fabrizio de André wrote another celebrated concept album, "Non al denaro, non all'amore, né al cielo" ("Not to money, neither to love or heaven"), based on Edgar Lee Master's "Spoon River Anthology"; the LP was introduced by an interview to Fernanda Pivano, the first Italian translator of the "Anthology" and one of Cesare Pavese's most intimate friends.

    The name of Fabrizio de André began to be associated with literature and poetry, and some of his songs found their way in school books.

    In 1973 Fabrizio de André wrote his most "political" album, "Storia di un Impiegato" ("Story of a White-collar"); the following year, De André issued "Canzoni" ("Songs"), a collection of his translations from Georges Brassens, Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan. The album also included a number of his old songs from the sixties.

    In 1975 Fabrizio de André (who, in the meanwhile, had divorced his wife Puny and started a relationship with the folksinger Dori Ghezzi) wrote together with another famous Italian songwriter, Francesco de Gregori, his "Volume VIII".

    With this album, De André breaks off with his "tradition" to find new ways for his poetry and music. The lyrics show how deep is the influence of modern poetry on De André's work.

    1975 marks a real change in De André's life: he begins to perform a series of memorable concerts (after his
    first performances of the early sixties, he had always refused to appear in public except for a couple of TV broadcastings), and plans to move to Sardinia together with his new love. To this purpose, he buys the Agnata homestead, near Tempio Pausania, in Northern Sardinia, and devotes himself to farming and cattle breeding.

    In 1977 the couple has a daughter, Luisa Vittoria (called "Luvi"), the following year Fabrizio De André issues a new LP, "Rimini". Most songs included in this album are written together with a young Veronese songwriter, Massimo Bubola.

    1979 is another milestone in De André's life. The year begins with a series of famous live concerts from which a double LP is drawn; De André is accompanied by one of the most renowned Italian pop bands, the Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM). At the end of August, a most striking episode occurs: Fabrizio de André and Dori Ghezzi are kidnapped for ransom
    by a gang of Sardinian bandits and held prisoners in the inaccessible Supramonte mountain. The couple is released four months later; no ransom is paid.

    When the bandits are arrested by the police, De André, though called to witness before the Court, refuses to denounce his kidnappers and declares his own solidarity with them. "They were the real prisoners, not I".
    This declaration is a good specimen of De André's way of thinking.

    This dramatic episode, and the hard life of the Sardinian people, gave him inspiration for his following album. The album is anonymous, but, from the image of a Redskin appearing on the cover, the mass-media call it "The Indian".

    In 1984 Fabrizio de André turns to his native Genoese dialect and writes, together with Mauro Pagani, one of his most celebrated albums, "Creuza de mä".

    The songs are a tribute to traditional music from all Mediterranean countries. The album is awarded an unending series of prizes and is greeted as "the best Italian album of the eighties".

    (...)

    In 1992 Fabrizio de André starts a new series of live concerts, performing in a number of theatres for the first time. Fabrizio de André's last original album, "Anime Salve" ("Saved Souls"), was issued in 1996. It is a sort of "spiritual will"...

    (...)

    In 1997 Fabrizio de André started a new series of theatre concerts and a new song collection, called "M'innamoravo di tutto" ("I fell in love with everything") is issued. This tribute album includes a version of "La canzone di Marinella" in duet with Mina.

    The "Anime salve" concert tour goes on up to the late summer of 1998, when Fabrizio de André must stop at the
    first symptoms of a serious disease which is later diagnosed as cancer.

    Fabrizio de André dies in Milan on 11. January, 1999, at 2:30 am.

    Two days later, he is buried in his native town, Genoa; the ceremony is attended by an immense crowd of about 10,000. Fabrizio de André rests in the monumental Staglieno cemetery, in the De André family chapel.


    DISCOGRAPHY

    http://www.viadelcampo.com/html/discography.html

    Suggested works.

    1971 Non al denaro non all'amore né al cielo

    This is a version of Edgar Lee Masters' "Spoon River" by far better than the original. For those who understand Italian, this is a great compendium of gorgeous music, poetry, style and political pride. According to Fernanda Pivano (who first in the world studied contemporary American poetry) this is one of the world's masterpieces of modern poetry. Get all of De Andre's Lps and get a good translation of his poems if you're not Italian, you'll find a poet whose words and music are as great as Bob Dylan's ones.

    1976 Fabrizio De André (a collection of his first songs)

    1978 Rimini

    Why should anyone who doesn't understand Italian bother with this CD? The first clue is found in the photos that come with the package. At first glance they are of the boring postcard variety, but closer inspection reveals a haunting quality, rooted in the romance of everyday lives being honestly led, with simple joys and companionship, lonelinesses and disappointments, childhood and ambitions. So much for the taste of the music. What about its smell? Sea breeze, old football socks, autumn leaves and the scent of a woman.
    Cultural references? Musically, reminiscent (but not redolent) of Roy Harper, Ry Cooder, Ian Anderson and, yes, Leonard Cohen (De Andre was renowned as a brilliant interpreter of Cohen) - honest, intelligent, inventive, romantic, committed, musically drawing on a rich native tradition and, with his deep lugubrious voice, combining acoustic guitar, violin, harmonium, girlie chorus and lots more besides, turning it to something which becomes, certainly in the title track and Sally, quite ravishing. You really don't have to understand the words, just enjoy their musical beauty.


    1981 Fabrizio De André (L'indiano)

    1984 Creuza de mä

    Released long before Paul Simon introduced world music into the mainstream, Fabrizio De Andre' released Crueza De Mar, an album which draws heavily from sounds far beyond the reach of western rock music. The album breaks new ground on many levels, not only in terms of musical direction, but also in terms of language. The album is recorded in the Genoese dialect -incomprehensible to most Italian speakers. Co-produced and co-written with former PFM violinist, Mauro Pagani, the album is often cited as De Andre's best work. Stand out tracks includes the wonderfully erotic Jamin-a, the evocative Sidun and the tongue in cheek A Dumenga, recounting life in Genova's red light district. My only criticism of this album is its length, 33 minutes of genius never seems enough.

    1991 Concerti (live)

    After having worn out vinyls like "Rimini" in the late 70's and the tape from the -79 concerts in Bologna and Firenze, it's a joy to be have these songs on the same CD. What can you say? This is Fabrizio de Andre at his very best. Intelligent, poetic, lunatic and Italian.

    TRANSLATIONS

    http://www.viadelcampo.com/html/translations.html

    *Titus' will

    First, Thou shalt have no God but Me.
    Often this thing made me think
    Different people, come from the East
    said that it was just the same
    Though they believ'd in a different god,
    they haven't done me no harm
    Though they believ'd in a different god
    No harm have they done to me.

    Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord,
    The name of thy God, in vain.
    Nay, when a dagger did pierce my side
    I cried out my pain and His Name;
    But maybe He was busy, or maybe too tired
    And did not hear all my pain,

    Thou shalt honour thy Father and Mother,
    Thou shalt honour their stick, too,
    And kiss the hand that broke your nose
    That time you asked them for food
    When my father's heart ceased to beat
    I did not feel pain at all
    When my father's heart ceased to beat
    I did not feel pain at all.

    Thou shalt hallow the Lord's holy days,
    'twas easy for a thief like me
    To get into temples resounding with psalms
    Of slaves, of their masters and all;
    Yet I've never laid bound to an altar in chains
    To be slaughter'd like a sheep,
    Yet I've never laid bound to an altar in chains
    To be slaughter'd like a sheep.

    Fifth commandment: Thou shalt not steal,
    And this must I have kept, for sure,
    When I cleanëd out the pockets and purses
    Of many an authorised thief,
    But I was an outlaw and robb'd in my own name,
    The others, in the name of the Lord,
    But I was an outlaw and robb'd in my own name,
    The others, in the name of the Lord.

    Thou shalt not commit impure acts,
    >That is, do not waste your semen
    Get a woman pregnant anytime you love her,
    >and you will be faithful to God
    Then lust disappears and the child remains
    And many do starve by hunger;
    I've often confused my pleasure with love
    But I have created no sorrow.

    Seventh commandment: Thou shalt not kill
    Otherwise, you won't deserve Heaven
    If you want heaven deserve;
    Well, see how this holy Commandment of God
    Was nail'd thrice to a wooden cross;
    Look at this Nazarene dying in pain
    And a thief's dying the same death,
    Look at this Nazaren dying in pain
    And a thief's dying the same death.

    Thou shalt not bear false witness, yes,.
    Help them though to kill a man
    They know by heart all of God's Law
    But always forget their forgiveness;
    I've sworn false by God and my honour
    But I can feel no remorse,
    I have sworn false by God and my honour
    But, nay, I can feel no remorse.

    Thou shalt not covet other people's things,
    Nor lust after another man's wife;
    Go tell it to those most lucky of men
    Who do have a woman and wealth,
    In other men's beds, still warm with love,
    I did not feel remorse,
    Yesterday's envy isn't all over yet
    Today I envy you your life.

    But now that the evening is drawing near
    Washing the pain from my eyes)
    And the sun is sliding down beyond the dunes
    To violate other nights,
    I'm looking, mother, at this dying man,
    Mother, I'm now feeling grief,
    Moved to pity not yielding to grudge
    Mother, I am learning to love.


    MP3

    Se ti tagliassero a pezzetti

    Rimini - studio version

    Rimini - Live version with PFM

    Canzone del maggio

    La guerra di Piero

    IL testamento di Tito (Tito's will)

    Creuza de ma

    Don Raffae'

    La ballata dell'eroe

    COVERS (very well done and very close to De Andrè versions which usually is a bad thing for covers but good for the propose of this thread)

    http://www.buonenuove.net/?c=mp3 (lots of songs here)
     
  13. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    Be sure to include Rafaele Carra.
     
  14. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    :eek:

    I hope you didn't mean Raffaella Carrà...

    Let's say she is (was) a showgirl not a singer.

    Next you'll ask me Toto Cutugno or Gigi D'Alessio...
     
  15. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    Yeah, that's who I mean. The last two names I don't know, but Carra's music is so wrong it should be in here.
     
  16. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    I like Bregovic but as you said he's not italian. His music is not italian. Even if he performs "Bella Ciao". ;)

    His "kalashnikov"... is a great song.

    btw thanks for the info I never heard his version of "Bella Ciao" I will look for it.

    Una mattina mi son svegliato
    o bella ciao, bella ciao...

    The "hymn" of italian partisans.
     
  17. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    I am not sure to understand what you mean... You don't like Conte and De Andrè?

    That's a matter of tastes. You surely cannot deny their role in italian music though.

    btw if you like Bregovic you will surely like "Creuza de ma" by De Andrè.

    p.s. When I was 4-5 years old my preferred song was "Maga maghella" by Raffaella... :cool:
     
  18. Microwave

    Microwave New Member

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    Sep 22, 1999
    there is a guy in Italy who makes great electro music under the name 'Bochum Welt'.
     
  19. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    I like Conte, don't know De André, but I will definitely look for him soon.

    What I mean is the next: I work in a night café and when everybody's drunk and you then play the Carra song 'a far l'amore comincia tu' everybody starts dancing. The drunker they get, the more wrong the music you have to play.


    I know, but this thread is about Italian music, and this is an Italian song, only played by someone not Italian.

    I'm affraid I must agree.


    .
     
  20. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    NOW I see. :D

    I suggest also "com'è bello far l'amore da Trieste in giù"...

    Bella ciao
    Modena City Ramblers + Goran Bregovic. ;)

    Nice mix amongst balkanic and italian music.

    Bella Ciao

    Una mattina mi son svegliato
    O bella ciao, bella ciao, bella ciao ciao ciao
    Una mattina mi son svegliato
    E ho trovato l'invasor

    O Partigiano portami via
    O bella ciao, bella ciao, bella ciao ciao ciao
    O Partigiano portami via
    Che mi sento di morir.

    E se io muoio da Partigiano
    O bella ciao, bella ciao, bella ciao ciao ciao
    E se io muoio da Partigiano
    Tu mi devi seppellir.

    Seppellire lassù in montagna
    O bella ciao, bella ciao, bella ciao ciao ciao
    Seppellire lassù in montagna
    sotto l'ombra d'un bel fior.

    E le genti che passeranno
    O bella ciao, bella ciao, bella ciao ciao ciao
    E le genti che passeranno
    Mi diranno che bel fior.

    Questo è il fiore del Partigiano
    O bella ciao, bella ciao, bella ciao ciao ciao
    Questo è il fiore del Partigiano
    Morto per la Libertà.


    Goran Bregovic - Kalashnikov

    :)
     
  21. tomo

    tomo New Member

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    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to sardus_pater again
     
  22. sardus_pater

    sardus_pater Member

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    Don't know him... I'll give him a try.

    Meanwhile I found this
    http://www.bochumwelt.com/

    His name is Gianluigi Di Costanzo. Don't know if he is a member of a group or he is the group.

    I saw he's friend of BluVertigo a very very good italian band (techno-rock) from Torino.

    I saw a photo of Morgan (former? singer and leader of BluVertigo) and I read about a cd made by Di Costanzo with another member of BluVertigo.

    Video - BluVertigo Assenzio (mpeg)

    Subsonica is another good italian band.
    http://www.subsonica.it/index.htm

    Video stream - Subsonica + BluVertigo - DiscoLabirinto (realmedia) (great)

    Subsonica - Tutti i miei sbagli (mp3)

    http://www.subsonica.it/audio.htm (various mp3)

    I also suggest Morgan's song "Altrove", great song.

    p.s. Morgan is Asia Argento's boyfriend.
     
  23. Chris_Bailey

    Chris_Bailey Member

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    I heard some of the coolest Italian music when I went into this dive of a store last March in Rome. Wish I knew what it was called still..
     
  24. RandyNA74

    RandyNA74 Member

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    Yeah, no joke.
     
  25. Smiley321

    Smiley321 Member

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    Apr 21, 2002
    Location:
    Concord, Ca
    I'll take this opportunity to pay my respects to the late, great singer Demetrio Stratos of the progressive rock group Area. A unique and memorable singer from the golden era of Italian progressive rock.
     
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