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Tips for a new left wing

Discussion in 'Player' started by red & wite army, Feb 23, 2007.

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  1. red & wite army

    red & wite army I ain't no drama queen!

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Country:
    --other--
    OK, last season I played under 17 and my team won the league.

    I have always been a left back. I am told I am fast and I like to make overlapping runs and put in crosses.

    I have now skipped a couple of age groups and gone right to the Senior 1st team because the manager watched me play a few times last season and liked what he saw.

    Now the new coaches and manager have started playing me at left wing but I need some tips.

    The style of play is very different and after an attcking style in under 17 with lots of skill, now they want us to play the way we are facing with alot more structure.

    He wants the left back and me to fill in for eachother depending where the other one is on the field.

    If the laft back goes up I must tuck in to the midfield so that he can pass to me, and then back to him....or vise-versa.

    Anyways, long story short, I'm a new left wing - any tips please!
     


  2. serieAfan89

    serieAfan89 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Location:
    North Carolina
    well, i played on the wing for my high school team this past season and the best tip i can give you regarding overlapping runs/covering your back is just to place yourself in a position where you can cover back if needed but also be there to provide for an outlet without going all the way back and losing the attacking edge.

    PS- I just got moved from the wing to right back for my club team, so if you could give me some tips on that it would be greatly appreciated!
     
  3. Shrapnac

    Shrapnac Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Let's see... fitness, fitness, oh yeah, and fitness.

    You're going to be doing a whole lot more running as a winger than as an outside back so the most important thing is probably going to be recovery.

    I switched from a winger to an outside back this past year and I'm rarely tired in games anymore from the switch but the one game where I had to play on the wing I was dead after about 60 minutes.

    Communication with your outside back is really important too, especially with overlapping runs and passing off runners to eachother.

    Of course your technical skill on the ball should be pretty high since you're going to be expected to beat men and use a lot of one and two touch to open up defenses.

    I can't really stress enough about fitness because there's really no getting around being out of shape as a winger. If you can't track back and are leaving men, or can't get into the play on offense enough because you're tired you're going to be seeing a lot of the bench.
     
  4. CCSC_STRIKER20

    CCSC_STRIKER20 New Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Country:
    United States
    Agreed. For every team that I have ever played for the wingers have been hard working and incredibly fit. That's why I always stuck to striker or central midfield. Like you said technical skill is also a must, work on moves that create space/get by a defender...because you will need them to complete crosses.
     


  5. red & wite army

    red & wite army I ain't no drama queen!

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Country:
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    Thanks for the tips so far guys.

    And any good ideas of moves that will create space and get me past players?
     
  6. Shrapnac

    Shrapnac Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Location:
    New Jersey
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1k7DGqRF5g

    Cruyff turn. Great for getting a yard of space. You've really got to sell it though, or else it just looks like you're pulling the ball behind your leg.

    In addition to that, jogging with the ball and cocking back like you're going to send a ball in and then exploding with a burst of speed down the line works pretty well. Similar to a Cruyff turn but you keep going in the same direction. This works well if the defender is on your shoulder, not necessarily if you're trying to beat him 1 v 1 as he'll sometimes stick his leg out and break stride, allowing you to power by.

    If you have good pace you can try to put the ball to one side of the defender and go around the other side and just out pace them. A smart defender will try to shield you from the ball if he doesn't have your pace but not all defenders are smart, or as fast as they think they are.

    Step-overs work well but you have to be able to do them at pace or it's too easy to follow and the touch after the last step over has to be combined with some explosion toward the ball. Step-overs are a great way to get a defender lunging and giving away free kicks too. You wonder why Cristiano Ronaldo gets fouled so much, it's because he's incredibly quick, step-overs while fairly easy still look really flashy, and no defender likes to get beat by flashy moves. You'll notice that after he makes that explosive touch after the last step-over he likes to trail his back leg a little too.

    Part of being a winger is being able to get off a ball in tight situations. Try to start playing balls using half of the original "wind up" that you would normally use. You see some of the world class players whipping crosses in and their foot barely leaves the ground. Players like Beckham play their best balls with a full "wind up" but there are other players who can play great balls in with really quick but powerful touches. Sometimes the quickness of the release on the ball is what creates great goals as the defense has that half second less to react.

    Work on putting the ball into really tight spaces, in the air and on the ground. Set up 2 cones 5 yards away from you and two more 15 yards away in the same line, or whatever line you want the ball to travel and try to put the ball between both. For variation you can angle them so you have to bend the ball between the two.

    Work on varying the type of ball you play in too, bent, driven, chips, etc. Not every situation is going to ask for the same type of ball. You're going to have to learn how to do all of these at pace too.

    I'm in a fairly unique situation as I'm a right footed player playing on the left so a defender forcing me to the inside actually works out in my favor. I can use either foot but I prefer to shoot with my right.

    If you're left footed work on being able to do all of your moves right footed as well or vice versa. Your set up touches with the opposite foot are all important to getting the ball on your strong foot in a good position. If you're chasing the ball an extra yard every time you do a move with your weak foot you're putting the defense in a better situation to win the ball and it puts you out of control.

    Always be looking up. As you're about to receive a ball, survey what's around you. All players, not just wingers should be thinking a couple steps ahead of what's going on. Good positioning and a good first touch can do wonders for a player.

    The all important. A good first touch is the best possible thing to create a yard of space or put you by a defender. If you can control that tricky ball that the defender might relax a bit on, you're golden. A first touch into space or an inch from your foot is going to help a ton. You don't want to to trap a ball and turn it into a 50/50.

    Edit: Holy crap that was long.
     
  7. red & wite army

    red & wite army I ain't no drama queen!

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    Repped, thanks alot for your time mate.

    The thing is that I've told so often that I should get the ball, take a touch, and pass on. I've been told not to hold the ball too long or else I'll just get kicked off the ball, which I have experienced.

    Thanks again mate, much appreciated.
     
  8. Wingtips1

    Wingtips1 Member+

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    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    if playing correctly, a lb/rb will doing more running than a winger. but you're probably playing with a sweeper/stopper which stops true play.
     
  9. Shrapnac

    Shrapnac Member

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    Feb 19, 2007
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Yeah, don't even get me started on our system. We play a 4-4-2 but one center back plays as more of a supporting/holding midfielder and the other is a sweeper, which means I have to follow runners through the middle all over the field while he stands around and fills space. It's pretty frustrating since I like getting forward so much. Oh well, guess I can't complain about playing 90 minutes every week.

    Regardless of that guys playing on the outside should still be the fittest on the field, whether it's in the midfield or in defense.
     
  10. polloloco

    polloloco New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Im pretty sure everyone has covered most of it but i just want to reiterate the fact that you need to be fit, and it doesn't hurt to be quick on your feet.
     
  11. Yid_Army99

    Yid_Army99 Member

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    Jul 16, 2007
    Watch Joaquín Sánchez on Valencia
     
  12. SergioRamos15

    SergioRamos15 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    i normally play right back but sometimes my club makes me play on either of the wings. I often check for a pass from my wide position,then lay the ball of to the center mid, spin off, then find the space between the opposing wide defender and the center defender and look for the through ball into the gap. It works really well if the defender doesn't track you while you make your run, leaving space to get in behind the defender, if that makes any sense?:confused:
     
  13. garethchelsea

    garethchelsea Member

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    Club:
    Chelsea FC
    Country:
    England
    simply just try to beat your man and get a cross in that is the old fashioned answer which is what a winger should do. if you are asked for more then you'll have to follow what is said. as you said you are fast so beating your man shouldn't be to hard
     
  14. snolly g

    snolly g Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    Club:
    Celtic FC
    yup. fitness is a definite requirement.

    but what you would need to work on depends on what your team needs.

    if your back line isn't great at distribution (has trouble finding passing options), then you'll need to excel at moving off of the ball, finding space, getting open, etc. this isn't really that hard to do. if you track back and then over to the touchline, the backs will usually be able to pass to space.

    if the defense isn't solid, you'll need to help mark on the outside so that the defense can keep its shape and play more compactly. if you've been a back all these years, you'll find this to be pretty easy. contain, contain, contain.

    that said, i think outside mid is the most technically skilled position on the pitch. being able to turn and beat at least one opponent is important. being able to switch field or cross from distance is important. but even more important than these are: 1. first touch and 2. crisp passing, because one-twos are the easiest, most effective and most important tools you'll have.
     
  15. SamuraiB1ue

    SamuraiB1ue New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    I think that speed and accuracy with pass are two of the most important traits of a winger. If you ever watch Aiden McGeady (Celtic), you can see that he utilizes this two aspects very well. Another aspect that is important is 1 vs 1. Most of the time, wingers are stuck in situations on the outside against the right back. The ability to beat a man is important because it grants a lot of room. It also draws out the center backs towards you. Having an accurate cross never hurts either.
     
  16. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    Club:
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    Netherlands
    a lot of fitness. another thing is be decisive and not passive. go at players with authority. use the width of the field as a tool too. when you are on the touch line you can see a lot.
     
  17. {CFC IGHT}

    {CFC IGHT} New Member

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    Liverpool FC
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    i play left flank with cfc in cleveland (lst in the state, 65 in the region) and i watch albert riera on liverpool. he is a good newcomer. then of course cristano ronaldo. but albert riera is good.
     
  18. xTottixCorex

    xTottixCorex New Member

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    Indiana
    well, albert riera isn't exactly a newcomer, lol. but he's a great player. what i do is watch some of the pro's do it and see what i can take from their style. personally, fitness, speed, and technique are my 3 biggest aspects in a winger
     
  19. BigGuy

    BigGuy Red Card

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    Old post I made yrs ago on training wing players.

    I train wing mids in a 4-4-2 and I do it functionally and not with drills.

    First you explain the wing mid roll in general with the team.

    That roll on attack is to be a short pass option ball side for every player on the field except players on the far side of the field. (Even to the striker at times, but that is rare could support from a window position. It becomes less rare when wing is playing off the ball coming in from the far side.)

    That is not an immediate concern and is worked on after he has a good understanding of what to do ball side when he does not have the ball, and when he does have the ball.You can use other players to help him, but first you can act as those players and work just with him.Then you work
    with him when he has the ball. What kind of movement you like him to make.

    Taking on the first defender. Then bring in a back for him to take on and beat or just play with. By that I mean changing directions on the first defender. The wing body position when taking on a back while dribbling is different from most other positions. It is not so much being in a position that faces the forward position. It is more of a side ways position facing the inside of the field.From that sideways position you can move forward or back or inside.

    On crossing there are a number of crosses the wing can make.

    A long cross across the field forward cross to a far side up player, that is in your defensive third or your middle third. Easy cross because your less likely to have a first defender on you just need the leg to do it to cover all that distance.

    A cross out side the area on the ground or in the air that leads the opposing teams retreating defense. Done after you pass midfield until just before the area. Leads the opponents first defender and the all or most of the
    other defenders. Best cross a wing mid can make in my view. Because it is a blind side cross that is behind the opposing teams backs even when they are retreating back they can't see the ball. It is a cross that can beat them all. Even one receiver can beat 4 backs because he can see
    the pass coming they cannot.

    Then you have the cross at the byline. That requires a lot of practice. Do this cross unpressured just takes practice, and be calm. With a defender on you takes a lot of practice. You need moves and changes of speed and change of directions so you can lose that back first defender.

    Not only that you need patience to lose the back at the right time. What's the right time when a receiver gets open. Then you need to be calm, skillful and accurate.This all takes a lot of time for the winger to do
    well. So it is not as easy to do as you may think even if the player can make a cross.

    Then you have the cut back pass. That even a little guy can do (meaning
    a young player)
    -------------
    Then what about the second defender. Is the wings vision
    and quickness good enough to beat that second defender? If the match up is a good one for the wing sure take him on as well. That clears the middle of opposing defenders.If he is a great defender and has good support positioning. You might want to lose him by moving inside the field on him.

    How do you know? Take him on once or twice, and see what happens. If you lose the ball, or get knocked on your ass and hurt. Go inside.

    Now lets say the first defender is great, and your great. That is a
    good match up for them. Make some long diagonal runs, and test out the
    other wing back. Get a good match up stay there and eat him for breakfast.

    On the inside move look to shoot. If that foot is weak again make the
    long diagonal run. And make an inside move and shoot from that side of
    the field when you find your self there.

    I also like to practice on a half field, but that is for group play. Not so much to work with the wing because the wing does a lot more things
    before he gets into the attacking half.

    On defense he gets behind the ball where ever the ball is on the field.
    Especially from an off ball position because he helps the backs. You
    can work on all these things and choices as a team during shadow play and
    with the use of freeze play. Moving up and down the field.A dangerous
    wing can ideally also one time a ball from the flank on goal.
    ------------
    Then you have the movement off the ball. Get in to that some other time
    and in future practices.So you don't make a good wing over night in one
    practice or even in 5 practices. These things takes time. Part of what
    I meant when I said I cannot build a good team in a short amount of
    time


    I feel all you really have to do in order to open up a flank is have the wing mid with the ball or even without the ball move inside the field. That will open up that flank for your wing back.
    -------------------------------------------------------
    Now the really good part.

    If the wing mid with the ball moves in side the field, and at the same time the strikers clear space to the side the wing mid left. Then seeing that the far side wing mid or the far side wing back makes a diagonal run inside to his neal post. The wing mid can make either pass to the far side wing mid or to the far side wing back whoever attacks inside. Make that pass that receiver will score a lot of goals. So it is a wing mid to wing mid pass or a wing mid to a wing back pass.

    Do walk throughs using both combinations and see what I mean. Also have both possible receivers walk it through so they can see it. You are going to like it
     
  20. {CFC IGHT}

    {CFC IGHT} New Member

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    Liverpool FC
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    he is a newcomer on liverpool though. but he is a hard worker. but thats what i watch for.
     
  21. xTottixCorex

    xTottixCorex New Member

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    Nov 12, 2006
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    lol, my bad. i remember him on Man City a couple of years ago. underrated player indeed:cool:
     
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